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Chief Inspector of Hospitals rates Coventry and Warwickshire Partnership NHS Trust as Requires Improvement

Published:
8 November 2017
Provider:
Coventry and Warwickshire Partnership NHS Trust
Categories:
  • Media,
  • Hospitals,
  • Mental health community services,
  • Mental health hospital services

England’s Chief Inspector of Hospitals has rated the services provided by Coventry and Warwickshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust as Requires Improvement following an inspection by the Care Quality Commission.

CQC inspected the core services provided by Coventry and Warwickshire Partnership NHS Trust - which provides mental health and community based health services - between 26 and 30 June 2017.

A team of inspectors, which included a variety of specialists and experts by experience, visited hospital wards and community based mental health services.

The CQC has rated the trust as Requires Improvement overall. It was rated as Good for being caring and Requires Improvement for being safe, effective, responsive and well-led.  The trust’s previous rating was Requires Improvement.

CQC’s Deputy Chief Inspector of Hospitals (and lead for mental health), Dr Paul Lelliott, said:

“Our inspectors found that the trust must make a number of improvements to bring its services up to a level that would earn a rating of Good overall. The trust had not made all the necessary changes from our previous inspection in April 2016 to change their rating."

“In particular, there were long waiting times for children and young people to access treatment for mental health problems. We also found long waits for children and young people to be assessed for a neurodevelopment disorder, such as autism. There were backlogs of referrals waiting to be triaged in specialist community mental health services for children and young people."

“The trust had not provided staff with specialist training to undertake their role on all wards for older people. Staff were not monitoring patients sufficiently to reduce risk. We issued the trust with a warning notice to improve care and treatment. The trust have not challenged the warning notice and had put in immediate plans to address the problems that we found."

“In addition, the trust had not completed its works programme to reduce ligature risks on acute mental health wards that had been identified during the previous inspection."

“Despite these concerns, we found a number of areas of good practice across Coventry and Warwickshire Partnership NHS Trust. Staff were kind, caring and respectful. We saw some services that went above and beyond to meet patient and carer needs. Patients and carers feedback was positive and highlighted the staff as a caring group."

"The trust had developed its approach to how patients were managed when presenting with challenging behaviours. The trust had developed person-centred positive behaviour support plans and had significantly reduced the number of patients who were restrained."

“The trust leadership knows what it needs to do to bring about improvement in the areas identified and our inspectors will return at a later date to check on what progress has been made.”

The CQC has told the trust it must take action in several areas, including:

  • The trust must ensure there is consistency in the ongoing monitoring and reduction of identified physical and mental health care risks in wards for older people.
  • Action must be taken to complete the trust’s work to remove identified ligature risks.
  • Seclusion rooms must be fit for purpose and the risk to patients and staff when accessing and leaving seclusion rooms is reduced.
  • All referrals must be clinically triaged on the day of receipt in specialist community mental health teams for children and young people.
  • Waiting lists for access to treatment must be reduced in specialist community mental health teams for children and young people.

Full reports for the trust are available on our website.

Ends

For further information, please contact Regional Engagement Officer, Helen Gildersleeve, on 0191 233 3379.

Journalists wishing to speak to the press office outside of office hours can find out how to contact the team here.

Please note: the press office is unable to advise members of the public on health or social care matters. For general enquiries, please call 03000 61 61 61.

Last updated:
08 November 2017

Notes to editors

The trust provides the following core services:

  • Acute wards for adults of working age and psychiatric intensive care unit
  • Wards for older people with mental health problems
  • Community-based mental health services for adults of working age
  • Specialist community mental health services for children and young people
  • Community-based mental health services for older people
  • Wards for older people with mental health problems
  • Wards and community mental health services for people with learning disabilities
  • Mental health crisis services and health-based places of safety
  • Forensic inpatient/secure wards
  • Community health services for adults and children and young people
  • Community dental services
  • End of life care

The Chief Inspector of Hospitals, Professor Ted Baker, is leading significantly larger inspection teams than before, headed up by clinical and other experts including trained members of the public.

Whenever CQC inspects it will always ask the following five questions of every service:
  • Are they safe?
  • Are they effective?
  • Are they caring?
  • Are they responsive to people’s needs?
  • Are they well-led?
Since 1 April, registered providers of health and social care services have been required to display their ratings on their premises and on their websites so that the public can see their rating quickly and easily.
 

About the Care Quality Commission

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and social care in England.


We make sure health and social care services provide people with safe, effective, compassionate, high-quality care and we encourage care services to improve.


We monitor, inspect and regulate services to make sure they meet fundamental standards of quality and safety and we publish what we find to help people choose care.