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Business impact target

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The business impact target is part of the government’s drive to encourage more efficient regulation of business.

CQC and other regulators are in scope of the target. This means we need to assess the impact on businesses of any eligible changes we have made to the way we regulate.

There are two requirements we must meet as a result of being in scope:

  1. We must produce business impact target assessments. These set out our estimate of the impacts of changes we make in our regulatory approach on business, monetised as far as possible.
  2. We must submit a list of all changes we have made in our regulatory approach to show that we have produced assessments on the right changes. An external body called the Regulatory Policy Committee (RPC) reviews these documents.

In the 2015–17 Parliament our 8 business impact target assessments show that, on balance, we saved businesses money by making changes to the way we regulate and we contributed a £3 million saving to the government’s £10 billion business impact target. The government’s target for this new Parliament is £9 billion. We will confirm our contribution to the target this Parliament to date when our assessment for 2017/18 is signed off by the independent and external Regulatory Policy Committee.

Business Impact Target assessments

Also known as Qualifying Regulatory Provisions, we produce business impact target assessments for these changes which are deemed in scope of the business impact target. As they are in scope of the target these assessments need to be produced and reviewed independently to determine what their contribution is towards the government’s targeted savings for business.

These are the assessments – or qualifying regulatory provisions – for changes we have deemed in scope of the target. These are reviewed independently by the Regulatory Policy Committee (RPC). When the RPC signs off these assessments, it means that the RPC agrees with our estimate of the impact on business resulting from these changes.

2017/18 reporting period

Title of measure

Description of measure

BIT score (£ millions)

 

Changing the Adult Social Care provider handbook

This change changed the platform and length of the guidance for providers on how we inspect and regulate them.

-30.4

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2015-17 Parliament

Title of measure

Description of measure

BIT score (£ millions)

 

Mental Health Act integration programme

In January 2015 we sought to improve the way we combine our responsibilities under the Health and Social Care Act (HSCA) with our Mental Health Act (MHA) functions. We revised our visiting framework for the regular MHA monitoring visits and developed new tools to use on monitoring visits, and increased the information we can gather about the way the MHA, guiding principles and MHA Code of Practice 2015 standards are being applied locally.

Zero

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New approach to inspecting specialist substance misuse services

In July 2015 we introduced a new way of inspecting specialist substance misuse services. This change encompassed collecting information from providers prior to inspection, announcing our inspections and publishing new guidance.

Zero

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Moving CQC registration and notification processes online

In Autumn 2015 we sought to move registration processes to digital platforms. We introduced a way that new providers could register with us online; previously applications would have been made on paper or via email. Once providers are registered with us they need to provide us with information every time their registration changes and whenever certain events occur. We have extended the number of organisations that can use our Provider Portal – a digital platform – to submit this information.

-3.0

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Amendments to adult social care handbooks

We published handbooks for the different sectors we regulate to provide information about how we regulate them. The contents of some of these handbooks changed over the last few years and we provided update versions on our intranet site.

Zero

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Provider Information Request for independent ambulance services

We collect information from providers prior to inspection through the Provider Information Return (PIR). This helps us what to look at on inspection. We introduced a new PIR for independent ambulance service providers.

Zero

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Provider Information Request for independent acute services undergoing an announced inspection

We collect information from providers prior to inspection through the Provider Information Return (PIR). This helps us what to look at on inspection. We changed the fields in the PIR over 2015-17.

Zero

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Provider Information Request for independent mental health services undergoing an announced inspection

We collect information from providers prior to inspection through the Provider Information Return (PIR). This helps us what to look at on inspection. We changed the fields in the PIR over 2015-17.

Zero

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Improved factual accuracy comments process

Following an inspection CQC shares a draft inspection report with providers before its publication. As part of this process, CQC sends providers a form to complete if they wish to challenge the factual accuracy and completeness of the draft reports. In August 2016, CQC issued a clearer FAC instruction and guidance document along with a new FAC form.

Zero

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Non-qualifying regulatory provisions

Every year we have to produce a list of changes or activities that are out of scope of the business impact target. These changes and activities are known as non-qualifying regulatory provisions. The RPC reviews this list to ensure that we have produced assessments (see table above) for the correct changes that we have deemed in scope of the target.

Last updated:
30 July 2018

 


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