You are here

Reports


Inspection carried out on 30 August to 13 October 2017

During a routine inspection

A summary of our findings about Ipswich Hospital appears in the overall summary

Inspection carried out on 6-8 January 2015

During a routine inspection

A summary of our findings about Ipswich Hospital appears in the overall summary

Inspection carried out on 7, 8 January 2014

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

This was a follow-up inspection to check two compliance actions around medicine management and pressure sore prevention management practices raised in July 2013 had been addressed. We found that the trust had taken appropriate steps. People we spoke with told us they were happy with the arrangements made for their medication and we could see that people were protected against the risks associated with the management of medicines. We saw that the planning and delivery of pressure ulcer care had improved significantly with the development of the tissue viability team and increased monitoring and staff training systems.

Our experts by experience spoke with a number of people who use the service focussing on support for people with dementia and learning disabilities and most were happy with the care provided and with the nursing staff in particular. We used the Short Observational Framework for Inspection (SOFI) to observe care to help us understand the experience of people who could not talk with us. We found good examples of compassionate effective caring services.

One patient said: “I have a treatment plan and I can give my opinion about the care I receive." A relative said: “The care my relative is receiving is exceptional, the three doctors and consultant have been honest and clear in their explanation of what might happen in the next few days.” Another relative said: "The nurses are very helpful; my relative is assisted with washing and his pressure areas are attended to regularly.”

We had minor concerns that people were not always consulted with regarding the risks, benefits and alternative options available to them regarding resuscitation practices.

Inspection carried out on 4 June 2013

During a routine inspection

We spoke to 27 people who used the service, seven visitors and 28 staff. We also visited eight wards and the accident and emergency department. We looked at 22 sets of records relating to people’s care and treatment.

People told us that they were happy with their care. One person said, “The best in terms of care, the staff are just so kind here. This hospital is so clean, it is spotless, the cleanest one I have been to.” Another person told us, “The care has been fantastic.” A further person said, “I have definitely been well looked after.”

People’s needs had been assessed and risk assessments were in place. However, the management of people’s pressure care did not always meet people’s individual needs and published research evidence and guidance was not always being followed.

People we spoke with told us they were happy with the arrangements made for their medication. One person told us that they were “always well looked after”. However, people were not protected against the risks associated with medicines because the provider did not have appropriate arrangements in place for the storage and recording of medicines.

On the day of the inspection, we saw that there were enough qualified and skilled staff to meet people’s needs. Staff told us that they felt supported and had adequate training to perform their role.

Effective systems were in place to assess and monitor the quality of the service provided.

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

The people who used the service were not asked about the service on this occasion.

Inspection carried out on 26 July 2012

During a routine inspection

We spoke to 30 people who used the service, four visitors and 35 staff members. We also visited 13 wards and looked at 12 sets of records relating to people’s care and treatment.

Most of the people we spoke with were happy with the care and treatment they received from staff. They and their relatives told us that staff responded to requests for assistance and answered call bells promptly. We saw that call bells were left within the reach of people. One person said “If I press the button someone comes right away.” We saw that on one ward response times to call bells was longer. One person told us “Staff take longer when they are short staffed as they are so busy and it can take a while for them to stop the constant beeping of the machines (Intravenous fluids). Its worse at night as it makes it difficult to sleep through the noise.” Another person told us “Staff are very accommodating and bend over backwards to help even when they are low in numbers.”

We saw that a family had left a written comment on a ward stating “The morale of the team seemed buoyant and cheerful”

People told us they were treated with dignity and respect and described staff as "Kind", "Caring” and "Professional." They said their treatment and support options had been explained to them and they were provided with additional information if required to make informed choices. We saw that when staff provided assistance to people they responded in a calm and reassuring manner. One person told us “Staff look after me well.”

People told us they were offered choices at meal times and there was a varied menu. They said they were provided with enough to eat and drink and staff checked if they needed refreshments. Overall, people using the service were complimentary about the food and said it was appetising. People who said they did not like the food said it was due to personal tastes.

Inspection carried out on 20 March 2012

During a themed inspection looking at Termination of Pregnancy Services

We did not speak to people who used this service as part of this review. We looked at a random sample of medical records. This was to check that current practice ensured that no treatment for the termination of pregnancy was commenced unless two certificated opinions from doctors had been obtained.

Inspection carried out on 28 September 2011

During a routine inspection

Over forty five people were spoken with or interviewed over the two days of our visit and most of the people (across six clinical areas) did not identify any privacy and dignity issues. People we spoke with told us that they were well informed regarding their treatment and care. They told us that staff consulted them and that they were involved in decision making about their care needs although most of the people we spoke with did not know how to raise complaints or concerns other than with the ward staff. However, they told us that they had had no reason to raise concerns.

Service user group members we spoke with told us that the hospital were quick to act on concerns and they gave several examples of practice improvements made because people had highlighted these areas as needing improvements.

All the people we spoke with said that the food was acceptable and that they felt the hospital was clean. They were all complimentary about the staff across the hospital. Whilst they said that the staff were busy at times they did not get the impression that they were short staffed.

Overall, the people with whom we spoke told us that the care at Ipswich hospital was satisfactory and in some cases good.

Inspection carried out on 22 March 2011

During a themed inspection looking at Dignity and Nutrition

The people we spoke with who use the service confirmed that they were listened to and were given the opportunity to express their views about their care, support and treatment. Some of the people that we spoke with were very complimentary about the medical staff, saying that they listened and clearly explained issues that related to their care.

Some of the people we spoke with told us that the staff are very respectful, always make time for them and treat them nicely even though they are very busy. However, they told us that some staff are better than others. Some people told us that they have to wait when staff are busy or they don’t come quickly enough or not at all. Some people stated that staff can be a bit rough but this is generally when they are busy or the ward is short of staff. Other people stated that they feel that they are put to bed too early, such as 6pm, making the night feel too long.

People told us that their preferences are not always taken into account, such as having a choice of male or female staff for personal care and not always being referred to by their chosen name.

People we spoke with gave us mixed feedback about the mealtimes, food and nutrition provided during their stay in hospital. Positive comments included that the food is much better than it used to be, there is a good choice and someone said, “If I fancy something not on the menu staff will try to get this for me.” Another comment was, “I enjoyed the food, I am never hungry and there is always enough to eat.” People also told us that if they require assistance to eat this is done kindly. Some of the people told us that the meals look alright but are tasteless, bland and not appetising. Other comments were that there is minimal choice for special dietary needs; the main meal and a hot dessert are given at the same time so the dessert has to be eaten cold.