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Making Space Domiciliary Care & Outreach Service Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 5 July 2017

During a routine inspection

We undertook an announced inspection on 5 July 2017.

We gave the provider 48 hours’ notice of our intention to undertake an inspection. This was because the organisation provides a domiciliary care service to people in their homes; we needed to be sure that someone would be available at the office. Making Space Domiciliary Care & Outreach Service provides care and support to people who reside in supported tenancies or within their own homes and assist and encourage people to gain confidence in respect of their daily living skills. At the time of our inspection 10 people were receiving personal care in supported living services and 61 people received support with personal care from the domiciliary care service.

At the last inspection in December 2014, the service was rated Good. At this inspection we found the service remained Good.

There was a registered manager in post at the time of our inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Registered providers and registered managers are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People continued to receive care in ways which helped them to remain as safe as possible. Staff understood the risks to people’s safety and were able to respond to people's needs. Staff we spoke with recognised the different types of abuse. There were systems in place to guide staff in reporting any concerns. There were enough staff available to ensure people’s needs were met. People were supported to receive their medicines by trained staff who knew the risks associated with them.

The care people received continued to be effective. Staff received training which matched the needs of people they supported. People were supported to have choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service support this practice. Staff ensured people agreed to the support offered before assisting them. People were supported to eat and drink well when part of their identified needs. They were supported to stay well and access to health care services when they needed to.

People had built caring relationships with staff and were encouraged to make their own choices and maintain their independence. People were treated with dignity and staff were respectful to people’s wishes. People and their relatives said staff and management team were caring and kind.

People and their relatives’ views and suggestions were listened to. People’s care plans reflected their preferences and people told us the service adapted to meet their needs. Systems were in place to promote and manage complaints. The registered manager was proactive in contacting people and their relatives during times of change to ensure the service responses were tailored to people’s needs.

Staff were involved in meetings, to share their views and concerns about the quality of the service. People and staff said the management team were accessible and would take action when needed.

People, their relatives and staff were encouraged to make any suggestions to improve the care provided and develop the service further. Regular checks were in place to assess and monitor the quality of the service and action taken to drive through improvements for the benefit of people who were supported by the service.

Inspection carried out on 30th December 2014

During a routine inspection

Making Space Domiciliary Care & Outreach Service provides care and support to people who reside in supported tenancies or within their own homes. At the time of the visit there were eleven people within the supported living scheme, living in their own individual tenancies and 17 people receiving outreach support within their own homes. The service was registered to support people with a range of mental and physical health difficulties.

There was a registered manager who was responsible for both supported tenancy and outreach support. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People we spoke with, within the supported living scheme, felt safe within the service and told us staff were kind and respectful towards them. People who used the service were encouraged to contribute to their care plans to ensure they were person centred.

Medication systems were in place to help minimise the risk of harm to people who used the service. Staff were recruited safely and the service had robust induction processes in place. Staff undertook regular on-going training and supervisions.

Safeguarding policies and procedures were in place and staff we spoke with were aware of these and were confident to follow them if necessary. The service also had whistle blowing and lone working policies in place to assist staff to feel safe and help ensure any poor practice could be reported appropriately.

We saw that activities and outings were person centred so that people were supported to pursue their individual interests and hobbies. A good range of information was given to people who used the service and efforts were made by the service to involve them in their care and listen to their opinions and views.

Care plans included a range of health and personal information. Consent forms for care plans were signed by people who used the service. People’s preferences, likes and dislikes were taken into account so that support could be individualised to allow people to follow their own interests. Tenants meetings were held on a regular basis, for those in the supported living scheme, and people who used all aspects of the service were supported to make their views known via feedback forms, by telephone to the office and informal chats with care staff.

Staff meetings were held regularly and staff encouraged to make suggestions and raise concerns. The management staff were approachable and staff and people who used the service were comfortable to discuss any opinions or concerns with them.

All staff had completed induction and mandatory training and further on-going training was offered throughout their employment. Some staff members had undertaken autism awareness training or personality disorder courses. Others had attended end of life care training.

The service worked within the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) when supporting people who used the service with decision making. There was evidence within the care plans of discussions around capacity issues and best interests decisions.

Complaints and concerns were dealt with appropriately and accidents and incidents were recorded and reported as required. Audits and checks were carried out on a regular basis and the results analysed to help facilitate continual improvement to the service delivery.

Inspection carried out on 6 November 2013

During a routine inspection

We met with two people who used the service and they told us they were given information about the services provided by Wigan Domiciliary Care. They said that they were treated well by staff who "understood their needs."

We also observed staff who were providing support to people within a supported living unit. We noted that there was good communication and understanding between the members of staff and the people who were receiving care and support. The people we met appeared relaxed, comfortable and at ease with the staff. It was evident that staff had a good understanding of what was important to each person, for example preferred clothes, meals and social arrangements.

People told us they were fully involved with their care planning. Comments included; "Staff are good and they know what they are doing"; "Staff are jolly and lovely" and "I don't know where I would be without them."

Staff told us they received relevant on-going training and support to enable them to deliver safe, person centred care. Comments included; "I just love coming to work. I look forward to supporting the people who use this service" and "I feel very lucky to be employed by this service. The organisation supports me to work with vulnerable people and assist them to achieve their goals."

Records showed that the organisation had a variety of quality assurance systems available to assess the quality of the service it was providing to people.

Inspection carried out on 17 October 2012

During a routine inspection

We met four people who were provided with support from the service. Their comments included; “We are very happy with the services we get”, “Staff ask us what is important to us in our lives” , ”We have just been on holiday with some staff, it was great.” , “We are given books about the services we get and who will provide them.” “They help me to enjoy my life”,” They never let me down”,”They are kind and friendly”.

People told us they were very happy with the service provided and told us the support was excellent. They told us they would tell the manager if they were not happy with the service provided.

People told us that they had no concerns about the care and support provided. They said if they had concerns they would tell the manager at the “main office.”