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Eton House Residential Home Outstanding

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Outstanding

Updated 13 August 2016

Eton House Residential Home is a care home without nursing that is registered to provide care for up to 26 people. During our inspection there were 24 people using the service.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The majority of people who lived at Eton House Residential Home had a diagnosis of dementia. The registered manager ensured there was a joined up approach for staff to understand dementia; how it affected those who lived with it and how the environment and positive engagement with people were beneficial to people's well-being.

The service signed up to Care England’s ‘Dementia Pledge’ to demonstrate their commitment to provide great dementia care and this was taken further by the registered manager who took a pro-active approach to ensure staff received learning that would enhance best practice in the area of dementia care. The registered manager obtained a grant that helped the service to develop a physical environment that was ‘dementia friendly’.

People and their relatives were overwhelmingly positive. We heard various comments such as, “The care home goes beyond caring, it’s the best”, “The care offered here is pretty high”, “I think the home is very good”, “There’s lots of communication between staff and relatives”, “I think this is a lovely place and the staff do what they can to provide for a normal life” and “If this is where I have to live then this is where I want to do it.” We saw outstanding examples of how staff went "the extra mile" to ensure people's care needs were met.

Positive caring relationships were developed with people who used the service and staff demonstrated an excellent understanding of their care and support needs. The service continually strived to develop their staff team to ensure people were treated with compassion, kindness, respect and dignity. Observation records carried out by management ensured people were being treated with dignity and respect.

People were protected from the risk of harm at the service because staff were well-trained and fully understood their responsibilities in regards to safeguarding. People said they felt safe from harm. Fire safety evacuation plans and personal evacuation plans developed ensured people would receive the help required in the event of an emergency.

People were given their medicines safely by appropriately trained staff. There were sufficient numbers of staff to keep people safe and meet their care needs. People and their relatives showed appreciation that there was not a high turnover of staff.

Staff spoke positively about their supervision and professional development support received. For example, a staff member spoke about how they were supported in their current job role. They commented, “I am dyslexic but I am signed up on a leadership and management course. X (the registered manager) sees our potential, gives encouragement, sits down with you and lets you know how they will support you. This has really boosted my confidence.”

People had access to healthcare services. We saw good examples of the service working in partnership with a local commissioning group and other health professionals to ensure the best outcomes for people.

People participated in person-centred activities within the service and in the local community. We noted a wide variety of social activities were on offer. This included the involvement of students from local college and universities, who provided therapeutic activities (reminiscence) for people diagnosed with various forms of dementia.

Care plans and risk assessments were regularly reviewed and kept up to date. Reviews of care were undertaken to ensure the service was responsive to people’s care and support needs.

People and relatives knew how to raise a complaint but said they had no concerns about the service. There was an overwhelming response of not having to do this as the service always communicated with them and let them know what was going on.

People were supported at end of their life by staff who was compassionate, understanding, and who had the right skills. We saw outstanding examples where staff cared for and supported people that mattered to the person who had passed away with empathy and understanding.

People received care and support from staff who were highly motivated and proud of the service. Comments included, “I enjoy working for the home, it’s a part of my life”, “I think management and team leaders are amazing, they’re very supportive. The culture of home is open and supportive.”

People and those who represented them were overwhelmingly positive when discussing how well the service was managed. Comments included, “The management and staff of Eton House is of the highest standard and has excellent leadership and should be an inspiration to other care homes everywhere” and “Very well led and all staff have a positive attitude towards their work which reflects on the management.”

The registered manager was involved in a number of accreditations schemes and ensured best practices was introduced to the service to improve the quality and safety of the care provided to people.

There were clear visions and values for how the service should operate and staff promoted these. The service had established effective quality assurance systems to assess, monitor and improve the quality and safety of the service it provided.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 13 August 2016

The service was safe.

People were protected from harm because staff knew what to do if they suspected abuse had occurred.

People were kept safe because there were sufficient numbers of staff to meet their care and support needs.

People were given their medicines safely by appropriately trained staff.

Effective

Outstanding

Updated 13 August 2016

The service was very effective.

The service carried out screening tests that helped to determine whether people were in the early stages of dementia. This had significantly reduced the waiting time for people to gain a diagnosis of dementia.

The service signed up to Care England’s ‘Dementia Pledge’ to demonstrate their commitment to provide great dementia care and this was taken further by the registered manager who took a pro-active approach to ensure staff received learning that would enhance best practice in the area of dementia care.

Care records clearly documented the positive outcomes achieved in regards to people’s health as a result of the service’s good working relationship with other health professionals.

Caring

Outstanding

Updated 13 August 2016

The service was very caring.

People who used the service and those who had contact with service, spoke highly about the caring attitude of staff. We saw outstanding examples of how staff went "the extra mile" to ensure people's care needs were met.

The service continually strived to develop their staff team to ensure people were treated with compassion, kindness, respect and dignity. Observation records carried out by management ensured people were being treated with dignity and respect.

People were supported at end of their life by staff who were compassionate, understanding and who had the skills in this aspect of care.

Responsive

Good

Updated 13 August 2016

The service was responsive.

People participated in person-centred activities within the service and in the local community

Care plans and risk assessments were regularly reviewed and kept up to date.

People and relatives knew how to raise a complaint but said they had no concerns about the service.

Well-led

Outstanding

Updated 13 August 2016

The service was very well-led.

People and those who represented them were overwhelmingly positive when discussing how well the service was managed.

People received care and support from staff who were highly motivated and proud of the service.

The registered manager had obtained a grant from the Kings Fund an independent charity working improve health and care in England. This enabled the service to carry out a number of initiatives which included improving the home’s interior facilities to be more dementia friendly as well as to create a therapeutic environment and outdoor garden, designed to meet the needs of people with dementia.