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CQC inspectors find Manchester GP surgery to be Outstanding in the services provided to the local population

Published:
2 September 2016
Categories:
  • Media

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has found the quality of care provided by The Doc’s Surgery, Manchester to be Outstanding following an inspection in June this year. This is a real achievement by the practice and a fantastic resource for the people of Manchester City Centre to have on their doorstep.

Under CQC’s programme of inspections, all of England’s GP practices are being given a rating in five key areas, are they; safe, effective, caring, responsive and well led. The services provided by The Doc’s Surgery have been rated as Outstanding overall.

A full report of the inspection has been published here: www.cqc.org.uk/location/1-637182525.

Dr Janet Williamson, Deputy Chief Inspector of General Practice said:

"It is clear The Doc’s Surgery is providing an effective and caring service which is a real asset to the people living in this part of Manchester. To get rated as Outstanding is a real achievement. “We were very impressed with the strong leadership at The Doc’s Surgery, which had a positive impact across all areas of the practice.

“It was also impressive to see how the practice used innovative methods to improve outcomes for patients, especially working in partnership with other local organisations and sharing best practice.

“One scheme started by a GP partner called ‘yoga on prescription’ was particularly inventive, and showed a real commitment to help patients take control of their own health. Yoga sessions were prescribed to help support the high number of patients who suffered from illnesses like anxiety, depression, low mood and generalised pain.

“This is a great example of what outstanding care looks like.”

The practice had a clear vision which had quality and safety as its top priority. The strategy to deliver this vision had been produced with stakeholders and was regularly reviewed and discussed with staff. This included clinical discussions daily every lunch time and formal clinical meetings.

The practice worked closely with other organisations and with the local community in planning how services were provided to ensure that they met local patients’ needs. For example the practice treated a small number of older Chinese patients and forged close working with a local organisation to help with translation services and support network.

One particularly outstanding example of care inspectors saw was around sexual health. The practice offered a full in-house sexual health clinic to registered and non-registered patients. It included same day results for HIV testing and a full screening and treatment service, something which is normally offered in a sexual health clinic.

The practice had the highest number of patients with HIV in the UK and had established close links with one of the HIV consultants at North Manchester Hospital and a joint clinic was held once a month.

The practice had also developed a “man fact sheet” on raising the awareness of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) which was already showing to be a positive tool in raising awareness. One example saw a high risk patient receiving a full course of vaccines so far. Interest had also been expressed in being involved a pilot project at primary care level.

Professor Steve Field, Chief Inspector of General Practice said:

“All of this hard work and dedication pays off in making a real difference for their patients – which is why we have found this practice to be Outstanding.”

Ends

For further information please contact CQC Regional Communications Officer Kerri James by email kerri.james@cqc.org.uk or by phone on 07464 92 9966. Journalists wishing to speak to the press office outside of office hours can find out how to contact the team here. Please note: the press office is unable to advise members of the public on health or social care matters.

For general enquiries, please call 03000 61 61 61.

Last updated:
29 May 2017

Notes to editors

 

Providers are required by law to display their ratings on their premises and websites, so that the public can see their rating quickly and easily. This should be done within 21 days of publication of their inspection report. For further information on the display of CQC ratings, please visit: www.cqc.org.uk/content/display-ratings.

 

About the Care Quality Commission

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and social care in England.


We make sure health and social care services provide people with safe, effective, compassionate, high-quality care and we encourage care services to improve.


We monitor, inspect and regulate services to make sure they meet fundamental standards of quality and safety and we publish what we find to help people choose care.