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Archived: Synexus Thames Valley Clinical Research Centre

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 12, 13 June 2013
Date of Publication: 25 July 2013
Inspection Report published 25 July 2013 PDF

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 12 June 2013 and 13 June 2013, observed how people were being cared for and talked with people who use the service. We talked with staff and reviewed information given to us by the provider.

We looked at all the information we hold aboutSynexus Thames Valley Clinical Research Centre.

Our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

Reasons for our judgement

Before people had the DEXA scan they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. We spoke with four out of five members of staff. All of them were able to explain their understanding of when and how to obtain consent. One member of staff told us about an occasion when one person, had decided not to go ahead with the scan following their consultation. The provider had up to date policies and procedures for consent and confidentiality in place.

People told us they were given enough information about the risks and benefits of treatment and sufficient time to enable them to make choices about whether to consent to go ahead with the DEXA scan. One person told us “ Staff explained about the scan before I consented.” Staff provided examples of appointments when interpreters had been encouraged to attend with people whose first language was not English.

Staff we spoke with told us information about the risks and benefits of having a DEXA scan were explained to people before consent to the procedure was gained. People had the opportunity to ask any questions and seek further information with an appropriately qualified member of staff before they gave their consent to have the scan. This was confirmed by people we spoke with.

We reviewed six sets of medical records. We found the risks, and benefits of having a DEXA scan were explained to people and this was documented. Each person had signed a declaration to say they understood the information given to them and that they consented to having the DEXA scan.