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Inspection carried out on 1 February 2018

During a routine inspection

This announced inspection took place on 1 and 5 February 2018. This service is a domiciliary care agency. It provides personal care to people living in their own houses and flats. It provides a service to adults. During our inspection, one person was using the service.

During our last inspection on 30 March and 19 May 2016, we found that there were no systems in place to monitor the quality of the service and ensure records were complete and up to date. Following our last inspection, we asked the provider to complete an action plan to show what they would do and by when to improve the key question ‘well led’ to at least good. During this inspection, we found that the provider had followed their action plan. For example, they had ensured that the necessary recruitment checks had been carried out on staff, that staff were provided with training and supervision.

The service had a registered manager at the time of our inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons.’ Registered persons have a legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were supported to take their medicines. However, improvements were required to ensure that staff had up to date training in medicines and that accurate records of medicines administration were kept. Risks to people’s health and safety were identified and assessed although further information was needed to ensure that information was specific to the person. People were supported by sufficient amounts of staff who had been recruited safely. Staff knew how to recognise abuse and were confident to act to keep people safe from harm.

People were provided with the support they required to eat and drink enough. Staff received training and training had been arranged when gaps in staff knowledge were identified. People were supported with their health care needs. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service support this practice.

People were supported by staff who were kind and caring. Staff respected people’s preferences and wishes about how their support was delivered. People were supported to maintain their privacy and dignity. The provider was aware of support available to people to help them express their views and wishes and told us this would be considered if a person needed this support.

People’s needs were assessed before they started using the service and people and their relatives were involved in producing and reviewing care plans. People were offered opportunities to take part in social activities and maintain their interests and independence. People were given opportunities to make a complaint or raise concerns about the service they received.

Systems were in place to monitor and improve the quality of the service. People and staff were complimentary of the management of the service. The provider sought and acted upon people’s feedback in relation to the service they received and staff told us they were supported in their role.

Inspection carried out on 30 March 2016

During a routine inspection

This announced inspection was carried out on 30 March and 19 May 2016. LMT Support Care provides support and personal care to people living in Nottinghamshire.

The service had a registered manager in place at the time of our inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were supported by staff who understood the risks people could face and knew how to make people feel safe. People were encouraged to be independent with as little restriction as possible.

There were not always sufficient staff available to meet people’s needs which meant there were occasions when people were not provided with their care safely. Staff had not been fully vetted to determine their suitability to work with people who used social care services.

There may have been occasions where people received support from staff who did not have the right skills and knowledge to meet their needs. People’s human rights to make decisions for themselves were respected and they provided consent to their care when needed. People received support from staff who understood their health needs.

People were treated with respect by staff who were caring and kind. People were involved in determining their care and support and were treated in the way they wished to be.

People’s plan of care contained information about the care and support they required. People were encouraged to express any issues of concerns they had so these could be acted upon.

There were no systems in place to monitor the quality of the service which would enable the provider to make improvements when needed. The provider did not notify us of certain events when they were required to.

You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full report.