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Laser and Light Ltd Also known as The Laser and Light Medical Skin Clinic

All reports

Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 3 October 2013
Date of Publication: 30 October 2013
Inspection Report published 30 October 2013 PDF | 91.79 KB

People should be protected from abuse and staff should respect their human rights (outcome 7)

Not met this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Are protected from abuse, or the risk of abuse, and their human rights are respected and upheld.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 3 October 2013, observed how people were being cared for and talked with people who use the service. We talked with staff and took advice from our pharmacist.

Our judgement

People who use the service were not protected from the risk of abuse because the provider had not taken reasonable steps to identify the possibility of abuse and prevent abuse from happening.

Reasons for our judgement

There was a policy of not allowing children to accompany adults when they were having a consultation or treatment. There was a notice in the waiting area to make people aware of this policy. Staff confirmed that they would never allow someone to attend for a consultation or treatment with a child. Staff told us that children were not treated at the service. They told us that occasionally children had consultations, but they would only ever have appointments with the doctor. This showed staff were aware of the provider’s policies for the protection of children.

People who use the service were not protected from the risk of abuse because the provider had not taken reasonable steps to identify the possibility of abuse and prevent abuse from happening. We spoke with two staff about their understanding of safeguarding children and vulnerable adults. They were able to describe what they might consider to be indicators of abuse and they understood they had a responsibility to report any concerns. They had no access to information about how to identify or report concerns and they had had no training. People may not be protected from abuse because staff were not trained to identify and report abuse. They did not have information available to support them in safeguarding people from abuse.

The provider did not support staff to respond appropriately to any allegation of abuse. Staff said they would report any concerns to the doctor at the practice, who was also the registered provider. They were confident she would take appropriate action to protect people. They said they were aware the doctor made phone calls regarding the care of some people, but they did not know exactly who she reported concerns to.

We saw that the provider’s staff handbook included a whistleblowing policy. It described the legislative framework which protects staff who report concerns about their employers. The staff we spoke with were not aware of the provider’s whistleblowing policy. One staff person said they would report any concerns about staff to the provider. They knew they could report concerns to external agencies and they were aware they could speak to regulators about concerns.

There was no guidance for staff about how to report concerns. The whistleblowing did not provide details about who staff should report concerns to either within the organisation or externally. This meant staff were not supported to report concerns appropriately.