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Laser and Light Ltd Also known as The Laser and Light Medical Skin Clinic

All reports

Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 19 February 2013
Date of Publication: 8 March 2013
Inspection Report published 8 March 2013 PDF | 86.87 KB

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 19 February 2013, checked how people were cared for at each stage of their treatment and care and talked with people who use the service. We talked with staff.

Our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

Where people did not have the capacity to consent, the provider acted in accordance with legal requirements.

Reasons for our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. We spoke with one person using the service. They told us they had been given enough information about the risks and benefits of treatment before giving their consent. They were aware they could withdraw their consent at any time and their questions had been answered so they felt confident giving their consent.

We spoke with the provider and one staff member who provided treatment. We found that staff were aware of the provider’s policies and procedures for gaining consent. They followed these procedures and recorded consent in people’s records accordingly. We checked records and saw that consent decisions were recorded. Both staff told us they always asked people to take consent forms outside the treatment room to read and sign. This was so people did not feel any pressure to give their consent. It also meant they had time to consider whether they had any questions. The provider told us they would only offer treatment on the same day as a consultation under very exceptional circumstances. This was so people had time to take away and consider written information about treatments before deciding to have treatment.

Where people did not have the capacity to consent, the provider acted in accordance with legal requirements. The provider and staff person we spoke with were able to give examples of when they had assessed people as unable to give consent. Both described what they did to support the person to make an informed decision. They gave examples including asking a person to come back when they were not under the influence of alcohol and asking people’s friends or relatives to help explain information in a way the person understood. Staff said they would refuse to treat someone if they did not have capacity to give informed consent. This meant people were supported to understand information. They were protected from agreeing to treatment when they did not understand. The provider may find it useful to note that staff were not aware of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and how they should assess capacity in accordance with this legislation.