You are here

Manor Park Care Home Requires improvement

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

We are carrying out a review of quality at Manor Park Care Home. We will publish a report when our review is complete. Find out more about our inspection reports.
All reports

Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 6 June 2013
Date of Publication: 30 August 2013
Inspection Report published 30 August 2013 PDF

People should get safe and appropriate care that meets their needs and supports their rights (outcome 4)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Experience effective, safe and appropriate care, treatment and support that meets their needs and protects their rights.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 6 June 2013, observed how people were being cared for and checked how people were cared for at each stage of their treatment and care. We talked with people who use the service, talked with carers and / or family members and talked with staff.

We used the Short Observational Framework for Inspection (SOFI). SOFI is a specific way of observing care to help us understand the experience of people who could not talk with us.

Our judgement

People experienced care, treatment and support that met their needs and protected their rights.

Reasons for our judgement

During our visit we spoke with five visiting relatives. All people spoken with were happy with the care and support provided by the care home staff. One relative commented: “[My relative] is well looked after here.” Another relative explained: “We were involved in reviewing the care plan recently. This is done every year and the staff speak to us about anything new in between to keep us up to date.”

The provider may find it useful to note that some of the relatives commented about the choice and consistency of food on offer to people living in the home. One relative said: “The food is sometimes too thick and stodgy and hard to eat.” We discussed this with the quality assurance manager. She agreed to review the menus and to carry out a survey people living in the home and their families about their views and preferences about food and mealtimes. This information would be used to make changes to the types of food on offer to meet people’s needs and preferences.

Because many of the people living in the home were unable to tell us their views on how they were cared for, we used a formal way to observe their experiences. This is called the Short Observational Framework for Inspection (SOFI). The SOFI involved observing and recording people's mood and how they interacted with staff and others around them at regular intervals over a set length of time. This was carried out in the dementia nursing unit over the lunchtime period.

During our visit we observed people’s experiences of living in the home and their interactions with each other and with staff. We saw staff spoke to people in a kind manner and with respect. During our observation we saw people were wearing clean clothing appropriate to the temperature. We observed staff communicated well with people and chatted to make people feel at ease and involved in their surroundings.

We spoke with seven members of nursing and care staff from the different units who were knowledgeable about the care and support needs of the people living in the home. They were able to describe what would indicate to them that a person’s needs had changed and what steps they would take to ensure that a person’s needs continued to be met. Staff we spoke with were aware of other healthcare professionals that could be involved in a person’s care. Staff told us they had a good working relationship with professionals from other agencies and how they sought advice and support from these specialists to provide appropriate care to meet people’s needs.

During our visit we observed people’s experiences of living in the home and their interactions with each other and with staff. On the dementia unit and the general residential unit we saw people seemed relaxed and well cared for. People were wearing clean clothing appropriate to the temperature. It was clear from observations of staff interactions with people living in the home that they knew people very well.

We reviewed six people’s care records; two from each of the three units. The care records included risk assessment information such as falls, nutrition and moving and handling. The care plans detailed how the person’s needs were to be met by staff and we found they contained sufficient information to enable staff to provide care and support to people. We saw these were reviewed and updated on a regular basis.