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Archived: Right at Home (Sutton & Epsom)

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 2 July 2013
Date of Publication: 27 July 2013
Inspection Report published 27 July 2013 PDF | 82.38 KB

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 2 July 2013, talked with people who use the service and talked with carers and / or family members. We talked with staff.

Our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

Reasons for our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. One of the people using the service told us, “I remember signing a care plan to consent to the care and support I get.” A representative of one of the people using the service, who was unable to make decisions about their care, told us they had been involved in planning and developing their care and support plan to ensure this met their specific needs. They said senior staff “take on board what we’re asking for.”

We looked at the service’s ‘consent to care and support policy’. This set out the legal requirements of staff to obtain consent from people who receive care and support. The policy also told staff where people had withdrawn or refused their consent to care or support, this should documented and reported to senior staff. This was to enable staff to identify any potential issues or concerns about people’s safety and welfare.

We looked at the records of five people using the service. We saw senior staff had carried out detailed assessments with people using the service and, where appropriate their representatives to identify people’s specific care and support needs. From these assessments we saw people were asked how they wished to be supported and cared for and their specific preferences and choices were noted.

We saw mental capacity assessments had been completed for all people using the service to establish whether people were able to make decisions about their care and support. Where people had capacity they had signed their care plans to consent to the care and support provided. Where people were unable to make decisions there had been clear involvement of people’s representatives in the planning and development of care and support plans that met their specific needs.

The registered manager told us they had received training in the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty safeguards (DoLS). These safeguards ensure that a service only deprives someone of their liberty in a safe and correct way. This is only done when it is in the best interests of the person and there is no other way to look after them.