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Archived: Hyde Park Healthcare Limited t/a Hyde Park Care

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All reports

Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 3 October 2013
Date of Publication: 1 November 2013
Inspection Report published 01 November 2013 PDF | 73.39 KB

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 3 October 2013, checked how people were cared for at each stage of their treatment and care and talked with people who use the service. We talked with carers and / or family members, talked with staff and reviewed information given to us by the provider.

We also reviewed the results of recent written feedback from people using the service and their families.

Our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

Reasons for our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. When people first contacted the service they were asked about their individual needs and what care and support they would like, as well as about the way in which they would like this to be provided. We spoke with people using the service and their families and they confirmed that this had taken place. These were used to draw up individual care and support plans. People using the service or family members were asked to sign these or specific 'consent to care' forms. We saw copies of these which had been completed appropriately.

At the time of the inspection there were no concerns about the capacity of any of the people using the service but there was a policy and procedure in place for what to do if there were concerns about someone's mental capacity. Relevant staff had received training in the Mental Capacity Act (2005) and what to do if they had any concerns. We spoke to staff who were aware of indications of diminished capacity and that they needed to report it to managers.

The managers we spoke to confirmed that they would involve outside agencies, such as social services, in undertaking mental capacity assessments. They said that if there were concerns about a person's capacity to make certain decisions people using the service, their families and appropriate outside agencies would be involved in drawing up decision-specific plans with regards to the where their capacity was reduced. When care plans were reviewed there was specific consideration of whether there had been any change in a person's cognitive or mental health and any implications on capacity this had.