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Go Global Vaccinations and Travel Health Clinic Requires improvement

Reports


Inspection carried out on 23 October 2019

During a routine inspection

This service is rated as Requires improvement overall. (Previous inspection September 2018 (not rated)).

The key questions are rated as:

Are services safe? – Requires improvement

Are services effective? – Good

Are services caring? – Good

Are services responsive? – Good

Are services well-led? – Requires improvement

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Go Global Vaccinations and Travel Health Clinic on 23 October 2019 as part of our inspection programme.

The travel health specialist nurse is the registered manager. A registered manager is a person who is registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We received 22 comment cards from clients who had used the service. All were positive about the care received. Many clients commented how professional and knowledgeable the travel health specialist nurse was and how quickly they were responded to when they requested information and advice regarding their travel needs.

Our key findings were:

  • There were some processes in place to identify and review safety risks and issues, although others had not been identified or considered. For example, there was no infection control audit and we found some infection control issues that would have been identified had an appropriate assessment taken place.
  • The process for prescribing using a Patient Specific Direction was not in line with legal requirements.
  • Health and safety risks had not been identified or formally assessed and we found some items of equipment had not been calibrated in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions.
  • Governance arrangements were inconsistently identified and reviewed, and we found there was little evidence of monitoring, clinical audit or quality improvement activity to ensure services were safe or effective.
  • There were appropriate safeguarding arrangements in place to keep clients safe and safeguarded from abuse.
  • Client risk assessments were thorough and determined the most up to date travel health recommendations supported by guidance.
  • The provider utilised resources and information from reliable and evidence based sources and used these to inform decision making processes.
  • Training, regular updates and opportunities to develop had been fully established within effective processes.
  • Clients were supported to make decisions and advised where to go for additional sources of support and information, when required.
  • Patient feedback was positive about the care and treatment received.
  • The provider had considered the needs of the population using the service and offered flexible appointments.

The areas where the provider must make improvements as they are in breach of regulations are:

  • Ensure care and treatment is provided in a safe way to patients
  • Establish effective systems and processes to ensure good governance in accordance with the fundamental standards of care.

You can see full details of the regulations not being met at the end of this report.

The areas where the provider should make improvements are:

  • Develop methods of gaining client feedback to include an assessment of the quality of clinical care received. Also consider how verbal concerns received as feedback can be utilised in analysing patient satisfaction trends.
  • Patient feedback should be actively sought. Identify how feedback can be retained for an appropriate length of time.
  • Improve how clients can access the complaints process online.

Dr Rosie Benneyworth BM BS BMedSci MRCGP

Chief Inspector of Primary Medical Services and Integrated Care.

Inspection carried out on 5 September 2018

During a routine inspection

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection on 5 September 2018 to ask the service the following key questions; Are services safe, effective, caring, responsive and well-led?

Our findings were:

Are services safe?

We found that this service was providing safe care in accordance with the relevant regulations.

Are services effective?

We found that this service was providing effective care in accordance with the relevant regulations.

Are services caring?

We found that this service was providing caring services in accordance with the relevant regulations.

Are services responsive?

We found that this service was providing responsive care in accordance with the relevant regulations.

Are services well-led?

We found that this service was providing well-led care in accordance with the relevant regulations.

We carried out this inspection under Section 60 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 as part of our regulatory functions. This inspection was planned to check whether the service was meeting the legal requirements and regulations associated with the Health and Social Care Act 2008.

The services are provided to clients privately and are not commissioned by the NHS.

The service is registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) under the Health and Social Care Act 2008 in respect of the services it provides. Go Global Vaccinations and Travel Health Clinic Ltd is registered with CQC to provide the regulated activities of treatment of disease, disorder or injury and diagnostic and screening procedures. The types of services provided are consultation and treatment services.

At the time of our inspection a registered manager was in place. A registered manager is a person who is registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated regulations about how the service is run.

We received 26 completed CQC comment cards from clients who used the service. Feedback was positive about the service delivered at the clinic.

We were unable to speak with clients about their experience of the service they received. This was because, on the day of our visit, no one was receiving treatment regulated by us.

Our key findings were:

  • Care and treatment was planned and delivered in a way that was intended to ensure

people's safety and welfare.

  • The treatment room was well-organised and well-equipped.
  • Clinicians regularly assessed clients according to appropriate guidance and standards, such as those issued by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.
  • Staff were up to date with current guidelines.
  • Staff maintained the necessary skills and competence to support the needs of clients.
  • There were effective systems in place to check all equipment had been serviced regularly.
  • The provider was aware of, and complied with, the requirements of the Duty of Candour.
  • The provider had an effective system for ensuring the identity of clients who attended the service.
  • Risks to clients were well-managed. For example, there were effective systems in place to reduce the risk and spread of infection.
  • Clients were provided with information about their health and received advice and guidance to support them to live healthier lives.
  • Information about how to complain was available and easy to understand.
  • Systems and risk assessments were in place to deal with medical emergencies and staff were trained in basic life support.

The areas where the provider should make improvements are:

Review the emergency equipment required by the service.