You are here

Great Oaks Dean Forest Hospice Good

All reports

Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 13 December 2013
Date of Publication: 25 December 2013
Inspection Report published 25 December 2013 PDF | 86 KB

People should get safe and coordinated care when they move between different services (outcome 6)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Receive safe and coordinated care, treatment and support where more than one provider is involved, or they are moved between services.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 13 December 2013, observed how people were being cared for and talked with people who use the service. We talked with staff.

Our judgement

People’s health, safety and welfare was protected when more than one provider was involved in their care and treatment, or when they moved between different services. This was because the provider worked in co-operation with others. The provider routinely worked with other providers and coordinated services to ensure that people's needs were met in a positive and joined-up way.

Reasons for our judgement

People’s health, safety and welfare was protected when more than one provider was involved in their care and treatment, or when they moved between different services. This was because the provider worked in co-operation with others. Our review demonstrated that the provider worked exceptionally well with other providers and agencies. This began at the ‘outreach visit’, which was the service’s first contact with the person and continued throughout the person’s care. We observed that details of other agencies involved in supporting the person, including roles and contact numbers of individual support staff, were recorded for reference.

Following referral, information about each person’s medical care and treatment was obtained from their GP. This was necessary as the GP was not always the referrer. Feedback was routinely given to the referrer about what support Great Oaks had agreed to provide. When people declined consent for emergency care to be provided to them, they were referred to their GP to discuss putting a Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR) agreement in place. When an agreement was in place a copy of the ‘yellow form’ had been obtained from the GP. The ‘yellow form’ was the agreed format for DNAR decisions recognised by emergency services.

We spoke with one person about how Great Oaks worked with other care providers, they said, “They talk to each other and try to work together”. A staff member said. “They tie lots of strands together.” Staff told us that when a change in someone’s needs was identified they contacted the appropriate health or social care provider to discuss this. For example, a change to pain relieving medication was needed so Hospice at Home staff liaised with district nurses from Gloucestershire Care Services NHS Trust to arrange this. We saw evidence that joint meetings had been held with the person, Great Oaks staff and representatives/ allied health professionals from other providers. NHS and other specialist providers, including Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) Community Specialist Palliative Care nurses (formerly known as Macmillan nurses), also held clinics at the Day Hospice. These arrangements meant that people who used the service could access specialist and hospice care in one place and the services they received were ‘joined-up’.