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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 14 January 2014
Date of Publication: 21 February 2014
Inspection Report published 21 February 2014 PDF

People should be given the medicines they need when they need them, and in a safe way (outcome 9)

Not met this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Will have their medicines at the times they need them, and in a safe way.
  • Wherever possible will have information about the medicine being prescribed made available to them or others acting on their behalf.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 14 January 2014, observed how people were being cared for and sent a questionnaire to people who use the service. We talked with staff.

Our judgement

People were not protected against the risks associated with medicines because the provider did not have appropriate arrangements in place to manage medicines.

The providers did not meet:

Regulation 13

Reasons for our judgement

People were not protected against the risks associated with medicines because the provider did not have appropriate arrangements in place to manage medicines.

We asked people who used the service if they had been given information about the medicines used in their treatment and care, including the risk. Three out of the four people said they had, the fourth person did not answer.

During our visit in January 2013, we identified that the medicines were in a cupboard which had no lock, in an unlocked room adjacent to the upstairs waiting area. During this visit we noted that although the medicines were now stored in a locked cupboard and locked freezer they were in an unlocked room which could be accessible to people who used the service. We also saw the storage of other medicines and medical equipment in unlocked fridges and a cupboard in treatment rooms adjacent to the waiting area which were accessible to people who used the service. In addition, we noted medicines stored in refrigerators that did not have temperature gauges. This told us there were not suitable arrangements in place that related to the storage and security of medicines. This also meant that people who used the service could gain access to medicines and medical equipment, posing a risk to their safety and welfare.

During the visit in January 2013, we identified three items of medication that were more than six months out of date. During this visit we identified and raised concerns with the manager about a number of items we found that had expired. This meant that people who used the service were not protected against the risks associated with out of date medicines. After the visit, the manager confirmed that he had disposed of the expired medicines. At the time of the visit staff were unable to show us a central system for logging, reviewing and monitoring medicines. The manager told us that they were in the process of recording all this information on a central log.

We saw that the provider had a procedure in place to record any medication given by the doctor after treatment. This was recorded on the electronic patient’s records. The information recorded included the item number, date, name and type of medication prescribed. This meant that the provider had a system in place to record medication and medical equipment used during treatment.

We saw that the provider had in place systems to record medical consumables used such as needles. This meant that arrangements were in place to record, monitor, and review consumables used