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East Living - Domiciliary Care Service Outstanding

All reports

Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 8 February 2013
Date of Publication: 19 March 2013
Inspection Report published 19 March 2013 PDF

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 8 February 2013, talked with people who use the service and talked with carers and / or family members. We talked with staff.

Our judgement

Before people received any care they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes

Reasons for our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. People who used the service told us that they understood their care and had given their consent by agreeing to their care plan. People said that staff always asked them if they were happy to receive their planned care and they had the right to refuse.

Care plans known as ‘support plans’ reflected people's individual preferences about their care, which included their identified gender support. Support plans and risk assessments were signed by the person receiving care or a relative to demonstrate consent had been given.

Staff told us that consent was covered with all staff as part of the induction. Where people did not have capacity to give consent, the provider acted in accordance with legal requirements. Staff told us that where it was felt someone was not consenting to care or treatment, this information would be passed onto a manager. Managers told us that ‘best interest’ meetings were held to discuss these concerns. These meetings involved external professionals and where appropriate a family member or advocate.