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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 9, 15 January 2014
Date of Publication: 11 February 2014
Inspection Report published 11 February 2014 PDF | 85.59 KB

People should get safe and coordinated care when they move between different services (outcome 6)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Receive safe and coordinated care, treatment and support where more than one provider is involved, or they are moved between services.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 9 January 2014 and 15 January 2014, observed how people were being cared for and talked with people who use the service. We talked with carers and / or family members and talked with staff.

Our judgement

People’s health, safety and welfare was protected when more than one provider was involved in their care and treatment, or when they moved between different services. This was because the provider worked in co-operation with others. Staff communicated effectively with other providers to ensure that continuity of care was achieved.

Reasons for our judgement

People’s health, safety and welfare was protected when more than one provider was involved in their care and treatment, or when they moved between different services. This was because the provider worked in co-operation with others.

We saw that appropriate information was obtained from other providers including GP’s and hospital services before people’s care and treatment started. This meant that the most appropriate service could be offered for each person. For example, staff told us how their specialist consultant worked with people’s GPs, to advise them when managing people’s symptoms became complex. This meant that people who did not wish to be admitted to the hospice could be supported at home. This was done through the provider’s Hospice at Home service in partnership with other community based providers, including specialist nurses. One person said their GP had been “Very much involved” and had “Popped in” to the hospice to see them. They said, “There is such a sense of team. People introduce themselves, they work as a team and all help each other out.” Another person told us that staff had spoken with a specialist health professional who regularly supported them at home, to check how to manage a particular need. This meant that there had been no gaps in the specialist care provided to them. Other people were less clear about how care was coordinated between providers but told us that communication and continuation of care had been good.

Discharge planning was started on admission to the hospice when this was appropriate. This meant that the person was not unduly delayed when they were ready to return home as arrangements were in place. ‘Fast track’ discharges had been arranged for people on occasions when this had been indicated.