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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 9, 15 January 2014
Date of Publication: 11 February 2014
Inspection Report published 11 February 2014 PDF | 85.59 KB

People should get safe and appropriate care that meets their needs and supports their rights (outcome 4)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Experience effective, safe and appropriate care, treatment and support that meets their needs and protects their rights.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 9 January 2014 and 15 January 2014, observed how people were being cared for and talked with people who use the service. We talked with carers and / or family members and talked with staff.

Our judgement

Care and treatment was planned and delivered in a way that was intended to ensure people's safety and welfare. People’s care was provided according to their assessed needs and risk assessments were reviewed regularly. Specialist and research knowledge was used to improve the quality of care provided.

Reasons for our judgement

People’s needs were assessed and care and treatment was planned and delivered in line with their individual care plan. People’s care was provided according to their assessed needs and risk assessments were reviewed regularly. The provider may find it useful to note that documentation of agreed care plans did not always reflect the care provided to people. We reviewed the care records of two of the people we had spoken with and found that care planning documentation was inconsistent. Some core care plans had no information completed whilst others were personalised to reflect the individual’s needs. For example, one person had a specialist mattress on their bed to reduce the risk of them developing a pressure ulcer, but use of this had not been documented. Lack of documentation of this aspect of care did not have a negative impact on the person, however we discussed this with a senior staff member and the registered manager. We were assured that action was being taken to address shortfalls in care planning documentation, this included training and a visit from a key speaker.

Care and treatment was planned and delivered in a way that was intended to ensure people’s safety and welfare. We observed staff handover and spoke with three members of the inpatient (ward) team. We found that communication between different shifts and staff groups was effective. Working practices, including handover at the bedside and checking medication charts, contributed to maintaining safety and people’s welfare. Two staff members commented about how well the medical team worked with them, both sharing information and listening to them. When we returned on the second day of our inspection we saw that one person’s discharge had been delayed to ensure they were safe to return home.

People’s care and treatment reflected relevant research and guidance. Staff had access to current professional journals and research articles via subscriptions and online search facilities. A senior staff member told us how they were using the ‘Stop the Pressure’ campaign, which is supported by NHS England, to reduce the risks of people developing pressure ulcers. Some staff working at the service were conducting research in relevant treatment areas including symptom control.

There were arrangements in place to deal with foreseeable emergencies. Emergency equipment was appropriately located and checked and staff were clear about how to respond in the scenarios we presented them with.

No restrictions were in place that required authorisation by the Court of Protection, or by a Supervisory Body under the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards.