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Archived: United Response - Nottingham DCA

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 26 February 2014
Date of Publication: 9 May 2014

People should get safe and appropriate care that meets their needs and supports their rights (outcome 4)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Experience effective, safe and appropriate care, treatment and support that meets their needs and protects their rights.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 26 February 2014, observed how people were being cared for and checked how people were cared for at each stage of their treatment and care. We talked with people who use the service, talked with carers and / or family members, talked with staff and reviewed information sent to us by other authorities. We talked with other authorities.

We were supported on this inspection by an expert-by-experience. This is a person who has personal experience of using or caring for someone who uses this type of care service.

Our judgement

People experienced care, treatment and support that met their needs and protected their rights.

Reasons for our judgement

We spoke with people who use the service and their relatives. They told us they were happy with the care they received and felt involved in the planning and review of their care. One person told us “they speak to both us about everything. I am happy with the regular carers I have”. We looked at care records for eight people all eight were written in a way that helped care staff understand the person and how care should be given.

The registered manager told us that new staff must complete a period of induction when working with people who use the service to enable them to understand their needs, read the support plan and for the person to get to know them. During this period the staff member is not included in staff numbers on the rota. This was confirmed by staff we spoke with, one person told us; “One of the first things we do as part of the induction is sit and look through the support plans before you start supporting people. It’s a ‘my support’ plan and very much details all their likes and dislikes, the people we support are at the centre of everything we do everything is person centred”. This showed that people’s needs were assessed and care and treatment was planned and delivered in line with their individual care plan.

Each care plan included risk assessments carried out by the team manager. These looked at environment, mobility, risk of falls, safety on the roads and where relevant, challenging behaviour. Each location had separate risk assessments for lone working, fire safety and stress. For example we saw that one person had a risk assessment in place to ensure two staff were present when they were using a hoist to for mobility. A second person had an assessment in place to protect them whilst using a wheel chair in busy areas. This showed that care and treatment was planned and delivered in a way that ensured people’s safety and welfare.

People we spoke with told us care staff looked after their health well. We saw evidence of involvement from other health professionals including, GP, district nurse, dentist and speech and language therapist. This showed that care and treatment was planned and delivered in a way that was intended to ensure people's safety and welfare.

People told us the provider communicated with them well and they always knew which carer would be visiting them. People told us they could not recall carers being late and felt they stayed with them for the allocated amount of time. One person told us “They’re very good staff here, we got some new staff ,there aren’t many staff but I’ve got enough for me. ‘The manager’s nice too. She’s right funny’. Staff we spoke with told us; “We have the right number of staff on to make sure that care isn’t rushed and people get the support they need. If I was late, I’d ring the service to let them know what time I’ll be there”. A second person told us “We try and make sure that people are aware if we are going to be late but staff will always stay a bit later to make up for it.”

Staff we spoke with told us the care plans had useful information to help deliver care in the way people who use the service want and need. They told us the care plans were a good way to get to know people who use the service. One care worker told us “They are very detailed it gives you a good understanding of what support is needed before you work a shift with that person.” A second person told us “We are very hands on with support plans so things are already available for people we support before when we start working with them. Support plans have improved, we have enough information definitely.” This showed that people’s needs were assessed and care and treatment was planned and delivered in line with their individual care plan.