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Archived: Allied Healthcare Peterborough

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 24 October 2013
Date of Publication: 21 November 2013
Inspection Report published 21 November 2013 PDF | 80.6 KB

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 24 October 2013, talked with people who use the service and talked with carers and / or family members. We talked with staff and reviewed information given to us by the provider.

Our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. Where people did not have the capacity to consent, the provider acted in accordance with legal requirements.

Reasons for our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. Where people did not have the capacity to consent, the provider acted in accordance with legal requirements.

We reviewed seven people's care records. We found that people had signed that they agreed to their care and support. We also saw that these consents were reviewed at least once every 12 months.

People we spoke with (by telephone) told us that staff always asked if it was 'alright' to provide personal care and support. One person said, "I know the staff so well now they know when I am happy for them to provide my support needs."

We asked staff what they would do if a person lacked the mental capacity to provide a valid consent to care and support that they provided. Staff we spoke with were able to describe the circumstances in which agreement to provide care and support was gained from a person who was living with dementia. Staff went on to tell us how people were also given time to consider their agreement. People were not rushed or forced into making a decision about their care. People were assured that they would only be provided with care and support where a valid consent had been obtained.

Our review of people's care records showed us that people had also provided agreement to the management of their medicines and use of personal information. We saw that there were procedures and processes in place that enabled a family member or representative to sign on behalf of a person who was not able to provide a verbal, implied or written consent to their care. People who required this were assured that they would only be provided with care where it was in their best interest.

We asked to see the provider's consent policy. We saw that this included information and guidance for staff if the use of an advocacy service was required for people who required this support. People who use the service were provided with every opportunity and assistance in providing agreement to their care, including nursing care, if this was required.

Records we reviewed evidenced to us that staff who worked at the agency were provided with training and understanding of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 including that for people living with dementia. This would assist them in determining if people still had the capacity to provide consent and agreement before any care was provided.