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Archived: Albany Park

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 7 December 2010
Date of Publication: 18 April 2011
Inspection Report published 18 April 2011 PDF | 156.97 KB

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People should be protected from abuse and staff should respect their human rights (outcome 7)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Are protected from abuse, or the risk of abuse, and their human rights are respected and upheld.

How this check was done

We reviewed all the information we hold about this provider, carried out a visit on 07/12/2010, checked the provider's records, observed how people were being cared for, looked at records of people who use services, talked to staff and talked to people who use services.

Our judgement

People told us that they felt safe and could raise concerns with the home. Staff know how to respond to safeguarding concerns to keep people safe and protected from abuse. However, mental capacity assessments need to show what support people require to make decisions that affects their safety. Staff need to know how to respond to peoples' changing capacity to maintain their safety and well-being.

There is a risk that peoples’ needs may not be met if their mental capacity is not assessed.

User experience

People told us that they could discuss their concerns with the operational manager. A person commented that, ““I can talk to the manager if I have concerns.” We observed that staff spoke to people in a manner that showed respect. We spoke to staff about their understanding of safeguarding people. They knew how to recognise the signs of abuse. Staff told us that they had training on safeguarding adults. This meant that people were protected from potential abuse.

People told us that they had information about what to do if they had concerns about the way they were being treated. We saw that there was a poster telling people who they should contact if they had any concerns. A person told us when asked about this, “I know what to do, there's information available." People know how to raise concerns about issues that affect their well-being.

Other evidence

There have been a number of safeguarding issues over the last year. These concerned the care provided to people. There has been a change of management of the home. Feedback from social care and health professionals has confirmed that the necessary improvements to safeguard people are taking place. We were sent a copy of the latest action plan which relates to the issues raised in these safeguarding investigations. It showed us that the issues had been or are being addressed. Recent feedback from professionals confirms that the home is cooperating fully and that the service has been improving.

The home has a policy of safeguarding. The operations manager is updating this policy. Training records showed that staff had received training in safeguarding adults. The operations manager explained that this will be followed up with further training. The operations manager explained that safeguarding issues are discussed at team meetings. The home monitors potential concerns and make sure they are addressed to support peoples well-being.

We looked at the mental capacity assessments for a number of people. These had been carried out by the homes staff. These assessments did not clearly explain how peoples’ capacity might change at different times. We found that mental capacity assessment used stock phrases. One person whose care plan we looked at had dementia. The person’s capacity assessment did not show how this would affect their ability to take decisions. Training records showed that staff had not received training on the Mental Capacity Act. We observed that staff did not from show the way they worked that they understood how do respond to peoples' varying capacity. Peoples' changing capacity to make decisions needs to be assessed. Staff needs to know how to respond to people's changing capacity to maintain their safety and well-being.