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Archived: RNIB Wavertree House

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 5 November 2013
Date of Publication: 12 December 2013
Inspection Report published 12 December 2013 PDF | 90.9 KB

Overview

Inspection carried out on 5 November 2013

During a routine inspection

As a Royal National Institute for Blind People (RNIB) home, staff and people who used the service had the support of and access to the skills and expertise of the organisation.There were specially trained staff experienced in supporting people with sight problems and/or hearing loss. The home had been designed to support people who had been blind or partially sighted for many years, or had only begun to experience difficulties with their sight as people had got older. Equipment was available in the home to enable people to reference information in a format to meet their individual care needs.

There were 28 people who used the service at the time of our inspection. We looked at supporting care documentation and staff documentation. There was not a registered manager for the service. We spoke with the manager, the deputy manager, two senior care workers, three care workers, an activities co-ordinator, seven people who used the service and a visiting relative. We observed care workers supporting people in the service.

This told us people’s care needs had been assessed and reviewed, and care and treatment had been planned and delivered as detailed in their individual care plan. Comments received from people who used the service included, “You’re in a community, I’m very happy here,” “It’s very good here. What I like is that it’s quiet and peaceful,” “It’s good here. The treatment is co-operative here with the manager and the staff,” and “Best care you can find because it’s geared towards the blind.”

All the people we spoke with told us they thought the service was kept clean. However, there were not effective systems in place to reduce the risk and spread of infection.

Appropriate arrangements were in place in relation to obtaining, storing, administering and recording medication. All the people we spoke with told us where their medication had been administered this had worked well.

Records and processes in place ensured staff who worked in the service had the right skills and qualifications to undertake their job. Staff had training and development opportunities and told us they were well supported.

Systems were in place to review and monitor the quality of the care provided.