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Archived: Forest Edge

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 26 September 2013
Date of Publication: 25 October 2013
Inspection Report published 25 October 2013 PDF | 78.72 KB

People should get safe and appropriate care that meets their needs and supports their rights (outcome 4)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Experience effective, safe and appropriate care, treatment and support that meets their needs and protects their rights.

How this check was done

We carried out a visit on 26 September 2013, talked with people who use the service, talked with carers and / or family members and talked with staff.

We used the Short Observational Framework for Inspection (SOFI). SOFI is a specific way of observing care to help us understand the experience of people who could not talk with us.

Our judgement

Care and treatment was planned and delivered in a way that was intended to ensure people's safety and welfare.

Reasons for our judgement

People's needs were assessed and care and treatment was planned and delivered in line with their individual care plan. We looked at four care plans which included pre-admission assessments. The assessments covered all emotional, social and health care needs. The care plans contained details of the aims and objectives to maintain levels of independence to the person so that they felt comfortable at the home. Daily care notes were updated with the care given and details of the moods and feelings of the people living at the home. One relative we spoke with said: "My relative is well cared for. I am very confident that the care I see when I am here continues when I am not here".

Some people were unable to talk with us because of their degree of dementia. To help us to understand their experience of living in the home we used the Short Observational Framework for Inspection (SOFI). SOFI is a specific way of observing care to help us to understand the experience of people who could not talk with us. We observed care and support during lunchtime. Care workers gave appropriate support to people who needed help to eat. They did not rush people and asked people what food they wanted to eat next. Care workers responded positively towards people, spending time with them and reassuring them. This had a positive effect upon the mood of the people concerned.

We saw that care plans were reviewed monthly or as people’s needs changed. Where people were not able to participate in their assessments or reviews of care their family were involved. The manager carried out annual reviews of care in addition to monthly reviews where relatives of people who used the service were invited, with the documented consent of the person who used the service, to attend the annual review. This meant that care and treatment was planned and delivered in a way that was intended to ensure people's safety and welfare.

People confirmed that their privacy and dignity was maintained when they received support and care from care workers. We observed people knocking on people's bedroom doors and speaking with people using their preferred name. Throughout our visit we observed that care workers provided support in a caring respectful manner. One person said: "It's really homely here. The staff are all very kind and helpful. I wouldn't want to live anywhere else". Another person we spoke with said: "The people who look after me really do care. Nothing is too much trouble for them".

There were arrangements in place to deal with foreseeable emergencies. There was an emergency evacuation plan in place and this provided details of how people needed to be moved, and what level of assistance would be required to evacuate the building if required. All of the people living at Forest Edge had a Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan (PEEP). Emergency evacuation sledges were located at the two stairwells to assist with the safe moving of people from the building in the event of evacuation.