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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 22 November 2018

Moorland House provides accommodation and personal care for up to 20 older people, some of whom are living with dementia. The home is set in its own grounds close to the beach, cafe and local shops. The accommodation comprises two lounges and a dining room which overlooks the garden. Planning permission for a new extension had been granted.

Moorland House is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

There was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the home. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the home is run.

Fire and legionella risks assessments needed to be more robust. Infection prevention and control procedures continue to require some improvement.

Improvements had been made to ensure staff received training, supervision and appraisal to provide them with the required skills, knowledge and competencies for their roles.

There was a positive, supportive and open culture within the home. Staff felt supported and listened to by the registered manager and providers who were visible and approachable.

People were protected from abuse. Staff had received training in how to keep people safe from abuse and understood how to identify and report abuse if they suspected abuse was taking place.

Safe recruitment procedures ensured only suitable staff were employed. There were sufficient staff deployed on all shifts to meet people’s needs and keep them safe.

The management of people’s medicines was robust. Staff received training in administering medicines and people received their medicines as prescribed.

Risks associated with people’s health, safety and welfare had been identified and assessed. Emergency evacuation procedures were in place and known to staff.

People’s rights were protected because staff understood the principles of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005). Deprivation of liberty safeguards had been submitted to the local authority for authorisation when required.

People were supported by staff to maintain their health and wellbeing and had access to healthcare services when required. People were offered a choice of home cooked food and drink that met their preferences and dietary needs.

Staff were kind and caring and treated people with dignity and respect and encouraged them to make choices and retain their independence. People were encouraged to maintain relationships with people who were important to them. Family and friends could visit at any time.

People and their relatives were involved in planning their care. Care plans were detailed and described how people wanted to receive their care. People took part in a wide range of activities and events at the home.

The provider was working towards meeting the Accessible Information Standards. Staff used a variety of communication methods to communicate with people which helped them to make decisions about their care.

People and relatives were offered opportunities to feedback their views about their care and this was used to improve the service.

Complaints procedures were available and displayed at the home. People knew who to speak to if they wanted to complain.

The registered manager understood their responsibilities under the Health and Social Care Act 2008, including submitting notifications of events as required to the commission.

We last inspected the service in August 2017 when we rated the service ‘requires improvement’ although we did not identify any breaches of regulation. The home has continued to make improvements and these now need to be embedded to ensure consistency of the delivery of

Inspection areas

Safe

Requires improvement

Updated 22 November 2018

The service remained requires improvement.

Infection prevention and control procedures continue to require some improvement. Fire and legionella risks assessments needed to be more robust.

Recruitment processes ensured only suitable staff were employed. There were sufficient staff deployed to meet people�s needs and keep them safe.

Safeguarding procedures were in place and understood by staff. The management of medicines was safe.

Effective

Good

Updated 22 November 2018

The service had improved to good.

Improvements had been made to ensure staff received regular supervision and an annual appraisal and felt supported in their roles.

People received support to enjoy a healthy and balanced diet that met their dietary needs and preferences.

People were supported to maintain their health and wellbeing and had access to a range of healthcare services when required.

Staff understood and worked within the principles of the MCA. DoLS authorisations had been applied for appropriately by the registered manager.

Caring

Good

Updated 22 November 2018

The service remains caring.

Responsive

Good

Updated 22 November 2018

The service remains responsive.

Well-led

Good

Updated 22 November 2018

The service had improved and was now well-led.

Record keeping was not always accurate with some conflicting information in people�s care plans. Audits had not always identified some of the issues we found during the inspection.

There was an open and supportive culture in the home. The registered manager and providers were approachable and staff felt listened to. There were opportunities for staff, people and relatives to contribute their views about the home.

Staff understood their roles and responsibilities and the vision for the home. Staff worked well as a team and communication was effective.

The registered manager understood their responsibilities under the Health and Social Care Act 2008.