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Archived: Care at Home (Wearside) Limited - 13 Grange Terrace

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 23 May and 4, 5 June 2014
Date of Publication: 31 July 2014
Inspection Report published 31 July 2014 PDF

People should be protected from abuse and staff should respect their human rights (outcome 7)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Are protected from abuse, or the risk of abuse, and their human rights are respected and upheld.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 23 May 2014, 4 June 2014 and 5 June 2014, checked how people were cared for at each stage of their treatment and care and talked with people who use the service. We talked with carers and / or family members, talked with staff, talked with other regulators or the Department of Health and talked with other authorities.

Our judgement

People who use the service were protected from the risk of abuse, because the provider had taken reasonable steps to identify the possibility of abuse and prevent abuse from happening.

Reasons for our judgement

People who used the service were protected from the risk of abuse, because the provider had taken reasonable steps to identify the possibility of abuse and prevent abuse from happening. We found the provider operated an out of hours on-call system so that people who used the service, their family members and staff had access to support and advice at all times. Family members we spoke with confirmed that they could contact the manager at any time if they needed to. The provider had developed policies and procedures in relation to safeguarding adults and child protection. We viewed these policies and saw that they contained information for staff to refer to about safeguarding, such as what constituted abuse, key responsibilities and how to report concerns. The provider had a system for logging and investigating safeguarding concerns. To date there had been no safeguarding concerns raised. This meant the provider was aware of potential risks to people who used the service and had systems in place to monitor any safeguarding concerns received.

The care worker’s handbook contained information for staff about safeguarding and other related areas such as whistleblowing, lone working and professional boundaries. We saw from viewing the minutes from staff meetings that different topics were used as a theme for each meeting. We found that safeguarding and professional boundaries had been themes for previous meetings. This meant the provider was positive about raising staff members awareness of safeguarding and related issues.

The staff we spoke with had a good knowledge and understanding of safeguarding. All staff had completed safeguarding training since starting their employment with the provider. Staff were able to describe the various types of potential abuse and could give examples of possible warning signs such as bruising, marks, changes in people’s behaviours and moods and personal items going missing. Staff told us they were aware of the provider’s whistle blowing procedure and they confirmed that this had been covered as part of their induction. They said they would have no problem using the procedure if they needed to. This meant staff had the appropriate knowledge and information to help protect people and keep them safe.