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Douglas Macmillan Hospice Good

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 13 June 2013
Date of Publication: 12 July 2013
Inspection Report published 12 July 2013 PDF

People should be treated with respect, involved in discussions about their care and treatment and able to influence how the service is run (outcome 1)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Understand the care, treatment and support choices available to them.
  • Can express their views, so far as they are able to do so, and are involved in making decisions about their care, treatment and support.
  • Have their privacy, dignity and independence respected.
  • Have their views and experiences taken into account in the way the service is provided and delivered.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 13 June 2013, checked how people were cared for at each stage of their treatment and care and talked with people who use the service. We talked with carers and / or family members and talked with staff.

We were supported on this inspection by an expert-by-experience. This is a person who has personal experience of using or caring for someone who uses this type of care service.

Our judgement

People’s views and experiences were taken into account in the way the service was provided and delivered in relation to their care. People’s privacy, dignity and independence were respected.

Reasons for our judgement

We asked people if they were involved in making decisions about their or their relatives care. One person told us, “When I arrived, the nurse sat down with me and went through questions, asking me how much care I would like and what I like and don’t like”. Another person said, “I decide when to go to bed or get up”. One person’s relative told us, “I am involved in my relatives care. It’s nice to be able to carry on doing this for as long as I can”. We asked staff how they involved people in making decisions about their care and treatment. One staff member said, “I tell patients what I can help them with and then they can choose what help they want”. This meant that people who used the service and their representatives were involved in making decisions about their care and treatment.

People told us their treatment was explained to them in a way they understood. One person told us, “I got information through several conversations, and I can ring up any time”. We saw that there was a range of information booklets which were available to people and their relatives. People we spoke with told us they had looked at the booklets and had found the information helpful. One person said, “The booklets tell me what I need to know”. Staff told us that information booklets could be provided in large print or other formats at people’s request. This meant that people who used the service were given appropriate information and support regarding their care and treatment.

We saw that people and their representatives were involved in the design and review of the information contained within the booklets. We saw feedback which had been recently gained through a carer’s forum about the information contained in one booklet. We were told that the feedback gained was being used to make improvements. This meant that people’s views were taken into account in the way that the service was provided and delivered.

People told us they were treated with dignity and respect. One person told us, “Staff always respect me and knock before they come in”. Another person told us, “Staff never say, ‘we’ll just do this’, it’s always, would you mind if we do this or would you like this or that”. We asked staff how they treated people with dignity and respect. One staff member said, “I always treat people how I want to be treated myself”. Another staff member said, “I follow people’s wishes and choices, and I respect that people have different ways”. This meant that people’s diversity, values and human rights were respected.