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Archived: All Hallows Nursing Home Good

The provider of this service changed - see new profile

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 18 May 2018

All Hallows Nursing Home Limited is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. This service provides nursing care. All Hallows Nursing Home accommodates up to 50 adults, the majority being older people, in one adapted building.

There were 34 people living in the service when we inspected on 9 April 2018. This was an unannounced comprehensive inspection.

There was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons.’ Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At our last comprehensive inspection of 27 October 2016 this service was rated requires improvement. The key questions for safe, effective, responsive and well-led were rated as requires improvement and caring rated as good. There were breaches of Regulation relating to care planning and governance. At this inspection, improvements had been made and the service was now rated good.

You can read the reports from our last inspections, by selecting the 'all reports' link for All Hallows Nursing Home on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

There were systems in place to provide people with a safe service. Staff were trained and understood how to safeguard people from abuse. Risks to people were managed well and staff were provided with guidance about how to mitigate risks. There were systems in place to provide adequate staffing levels to people who used the service. Staff recruitment processes were robust. Medicines were managed safely. There were infection control processes in place which reduced the risks of cross contamination in the service. Where incidents had occurred, the service had systems in place to learn from these and use the learning to drive improvement in the service.

Staff were trained and supported to meet people’s needs effectively. People were supported to see, when needed, health and social care professionals to make sure they received appropriate care and treatment. Staff worked with other professionals involved in people’s care to provide people with an effective and consistent service. People’s nutritional needs were assessed and met. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. The environment was appropriate for people using the service.

People were treated with care and compassion by the staff. People’s privacy and independence was promoted and respected. People were listened to and their views about how they wished to be cared for were respected.

People’s care was assessed, planned for and met. Care records guided staff in how people’s preferences and needs were met. Social activities were in the process of being improved. People’s choices were documented about how they wanted to be cared for at the end of their life. Compliments received by the service demonstrated that caring and compassionate care was delivered at the end of people’s lives. There was a complaints procedure in place and people’s complaints were addressed and used to improve the service.

The service had systems in place to monitor and improve the service provided to people. There were ongoing improvements being made in the Trust intended to further improve the service provided to people.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 18 May 2018

The service was safe.

There were systems in place to minimise risks to people and to keep them safe from abuse.

The staffing levels were assessed to provide people with the care and support they needed. The systems for the safe recruitment of staff were robust.

People were provided with their medicines when they needed them and in a safe manner.

The service had infection control policies and procedures which were designed to reduce risks to people.

Effective

Good

Updated 18 May 2018

The service was effective.

Staff were trained and supported to meet the needs of the people who used the service.

The Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) were understood and referrals were made appropriately.

People’s nutritional needs were assessed and professional advice and support was obtained for people when needed.

People were supported to maintain good health and had access to appropriate services which ensured they received ongoing healthcare support.

The environment was suitable for the people who used the service.

Caring

Good

Updated 18 May 2018

The service was caring.

People were treated with respect and their privacy, independence and dignity was promoted and respected.

People and their relatives were involved in making decisions about their care and these were respected.

Responsive

Good

Updated 18 May 2018

The service was responsive.

People’s needs were assessed, planned for and met. People's end of life decisions were documented and their choices were respected. People were provided with the opportunity to participate in meaningful activities. There were ongoing improvements being made in the activities provision.

There was a system in place to manage people’s complaints.

Well-led

Good

Updated 18 May 2018

The service was well-led.

The service’s quality assurance systems supported the provider and registered manager to identify shortfalls, and address and learn from them. There were ongoing improvements being made in the Trust to further improve the service.

The service provided an open culture. People were asked for their views about the service and these were used to improve the service.