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Archived: Coastal Home Care (Hove) Ltd.

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

This service is now registered at a different address - see new profile

All reports

Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 23 April 2014
Date of Publication: 24 May 2014
Inspection Report published 24 May 2014 PDF

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 23 April 2014, observed how people were being cared for and talked with people who use the service. We talked with carers and / or family members and talked with staff.

Our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

Reasons for our judgement

We saw that before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. During our inspection we looked at care files of people who used the service. We saw evidence that people, their relatives or advocates had been involved in their care assessments. Consent to care and treatment had been received and was recorded in people’s care plans and had been reviewed. The manager told us, “We consider people’s consent at every review, or as and when people’s needs changed”. We saw that the service had policy and procedure documentation in place in respect to the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

The registered manager told us that they had completed relevant training and had a good understanding of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). The manager demonstrated a good understanding of a best interest assessment, and where required, who to contact to arrange this should people lack capacity to make decisions about their care. We were provided with examples of this taking place. This demonstrated that the provider had systems in place to gain and review consent from people who used the service.

The care staff we spoke with told us that they had been made aware of their responsibilities in relation to obtaining consent from people who used the service regarding their care. They also stated that they had an understanding of issues of consent, including the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and had received training. We saw documentation which supported this. Additionally we were told that they would raise any questions or concerns with the manager if required. One support worker we spoke with told us, “We have training around the Mental Capacity Act, as we work with people whose needs change as they grow older. We assume that people have capacity unless they are assessed otherwise.” This demonstrated that the provider had clear procedures to obtain consent that are followed in practice, monitored and reviewed.