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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 17 April 2018

Eglington is a care home. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. At the time of this inspection the home was providing care and support to six people with mental health needs.

At our last inspection on 9 December 2015 the home was rated Good overall. At this inspection on 24 and 29 January 2018 the home continues to be rated Good in all key question areas, therefore the overall rating of the service remained Good. The home demonstrated they continued to meet the regulations and fundamental standards.

The registered provider managed the home and had recently applied to the Commission to become the registered manager as well. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated regulations about how the service is run.

People told us they felt safe living at the home. The provider had safeguarding policies and procedures in place and staff knew of their responsibility to protect people in their care from abuse. Risk to people had been assessed, identified with appropriate management plans which included potential triggers that staff should be aware of and the steps they should take to manage risks safely. There were procedures in place to deal with emergencies and staff knew of actions to take in the event of a fire or medical emergency.

There were safe recruitment practices in place and staff that supported people were checked and vetted to ensure they could work in social care. People told us that there were enough staff available to support them. Medicines were stored securely, administered and recorded appropriately. People’s medicines were reviewed regularly to ensure they were effective and supporting their recovery. There were infection control policies and procedures in place and staff were responsible for cleaning and disinfecting the home.

Before people began using the service, they were assessed to ensure their needs could be met. Staff were supported through induction, training, supervision and appraisals and felt well supported in their role. People were supported to prepare meals for themselves and others to promote their independence. The provider worked with other health and social care professions to ensure people received safe care and treatment for their recovery. People had access to a range of health care services when they needed them. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People said staff were kind and compassionate towards them. People were involved in making decisions regarding their care and support needs and people’s views were taken into consideration when planning their care. Monthly residents meetings gave people the opportunity to discuss and be involved in making decisions on how the home was run.

Staff understood the importance of supporting people under the Equality Act; therefore people’s individual diversities and cultural backgrounds were respected. People’s privacy and dignity were respected and staff knocked on people’s doors before entering their rooms. Information about people was kept confidential and people’s independence was promoted to support their recovery.

People told us the service was responsive to their individual needs. People had a care plan which was developed based on their assessed needs and staff understood people’s needs and the support to provide. People’s care files included both their personal and medical histories so that staff were aware. People achieved positive outcomes whilst using the service and their physical, mental and social health had improved. People confirmed to us the progress they had made. People’s achievements were celebrated to encourage and motivate them and others using living at the home.

People were encouraged to be involved in various activities that could stimulate their recovery. Some people were supported to gain voluntary employments whilst others pursue courses to improve their skills. People were supported to maintain relationships with their family and friends and this was included in their weekly planner to enable them achieve these goals for their recovery. The provider had a complaint policy and acted in line with their policy when people had a complaint or comment.

Both people and staff told us they felt the service was well managed. The registered provider was passionate about the progress people had made whilst living at the home. People and staff views were sought through annual surveys, residents meeting and/or one-to-one sessions to improve the quality of the service. There were systems in place such as audits used to monitor the quality of the service and the service continuously learned and improved to ensure sustainability.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 17 April 2018

The service was safe.

There were procedures in place to ensure people were protected from the risk of abuse.

Risk to people had been assessed, identified and had appropriate management plans to mitigate the risks.

There were procedures in place to deal with unforeseeable emergencies.

There were safe recruitment practices and staffing levels in place was adequate and supported people's needs.

People were supported with their medicines safely. Medicines were reviewed regularly to ensure they were effective and supporting people's recovery.

There were infection control policies and procedures in place and staff knew of action to take to prevent the spread of diseases.

Effective

Good

Updated 17 April 2018

The service was effective.

Before people moved into the home their needs were assessed to ensure they could be met.

Staff were supported with induction, training, supervision and appraisals to enable them perform their roles efficiently.

People were supported to cook for themselves and others living at the home.

The provider worked with other health and social care professionals to ensure people received safe care and treatment for their recovery.

People had access to a range of healthcare services when required.

Staff sought consent from people and acted in accordance with the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA).

Caring

Good

Updated 17 April 2018

The service was caring.

People were treated with kindness and compassion.

People were involved in making decisions about their care and support.

People's privacy and dignity was respected and their independence promoted.

Responsive

Good

Updated 17 April 2018

The service was responsive.

Care plans were developed to ensure people's needs were met.

People's histories were included in their care plans to ensure staff were aware of the support to provide.

People were engaged in various activities to stimulate them and support their recovery.

People were supported to maintain relationships with their family and friends.

There was a complaint policy in place to ensure people knew what actions they should take if they were unhappy.

People were provided with a service user guide and could understand information in the standard written formats,

No one currently using the service required support with end of life care.

Well-led

Good

Updated 17 April 2018

The service was well-led.

People and staff were complimentary of how the service was managed.

The provider had effective systems in place to monitor and assess the quality of the service delivered.

People and staff views were sought through one-to-one and group meetings and annual surveys to improve the quality of the service.

There was a registered provider in post who had recently applied to the commission to be the registered manager and knew the requirements of the Health and Social Care Act 2008.

The provider continuously learned to improve the quality of the service.