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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 1 March 2016

The unannounced inspection took place on 21 January 2016. The last inspection was undertaken on 23 April 2014 and the service was found to be meeting all requirements reviewed.

Wilfred Geere House provides dementia care and is registered to provide accommodation for up to 27 people. The home is run by Bolton Council.

There was a registered manager in place at the home. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

There were sufficient staff in evidence on the day of the inspection. We saw from rotas that the service responded to people’s dependency levels to ensure the correct number of staff were deployed on each shift.

The service had a robust recruitment process and the induction programme was comprehensive. Training for staff was on-going.

Safeguarding policies and procedures were followed appropriately and staff were aware of these. There were two staff members who were safeguarding champions. Infection control procedures were in place and there was an infection control lead within the staff.

Health and safety measures were in place and equipment was maintained and tested regularly.

The service had an appropriate medicines policy and medication procedures were followed by staff.

The service catered for a large number of people who were living with dementia as well as some who did not have this diagnosis. We saw that people were free to walk around the building as they wished, whilst being discreetly supervised by staff. There was a dementia champion amongst the staff membership.

Care plans included a range of health and personal information and were person centred. Appropriate risk assessments were held within the care plans. Staff were aware of how to deal with incidents and accidents.

Nutritional needs were catered for and mealtimes were relaxed and well managed by the service.

The service was working within the legal requirements of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) (MCA) and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

We observed interactions between staff and people who used the service and saw that these were friendly, kind and courteous. People we spoke with who used the service, their relatives and visiting health professionals, told us they were happy with the care provided.

The service endeavoured to work in an inclusive way, ensuring equality and diversity for everyone.

There was a range of activities on offer and people were given choices in the course of their daily lives.

Complaints were dealt with appropriately and learning taken from them to help improve the service. The service had received a number of compliments from people who had used the service and their relatives.

Staff and people who used the service described the management as approachable.

A number of quality audits were undertaken, issues identified and measures put in place to help ensure continual improvement to the service.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 1 March 2016

The service was safe.

There were sufficient staff in evidence on the day of the inspection and we saw that the service responded to people’s dependency levels.

The service had a robust recruitment process and training for staff was on-going.

Safeguarding policies and procedures were followed appropriately and staff were aware of these.

Health and safety measures were in place and equipment was maintained and tested regularly. The service had an appropriate medicines policy and medication procedures were followed by staff.

Effective

Good

Updated 1 March 2016

The service was effective.

There was a robust induction programme in place for staff.

Care plans included a range of health and personal information and were person centred. Appropriate risk assessments were held within the care plans. Staff were aware of how to deal with incidents and accidents.

Nutritional needs were catered for and mealtimes were relaxed and well managed by the service.

The service was working within the legal requirements of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) (MCA) and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

Caring

Good

Updated 1 March 2016

The service was caring.

We observed interactions between staff and people who used the service and saw that these were friendly, kind and courteous.

People we spoke with who used the service, their relatives and visiting health professionals, told us they were happy with the care provided.

The service endeavoured to work in an inclusive way, ensuring equality and diversity for everyone.

Responsive

Good

Updated 1 March 2016

The service was responsive.

There was a range of activities on offer and people were given choices in the course of their daily lives.

Complaints were dealt with appropriately and learning taken from them to help improve the service.

The service had received a number of compliments from people who had used the service and their relatives.

Well-led

Good

Updated 1 March 2016

The service was well-led.

Staff and people who used the service described the management as approachable.

A number of quality audits were undertaken, issues identified and measures put in place to help ensure continual improvement to the service.

Current good practice guidance was followed by the service.