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We are carrying out checks at Heatherwood Nursing Home using our new way of inspecting services. We will publish a report when our check is complete.

Reports


Inspection carried out on 24 June 2015

During a routine inspection

We inspected Heatherwood Nursing Home on 24 June 2015. The inspection was unannounced.

Heatherwood Nursing Home is registered to provide accommodation and personal care for up to 22 adults who may also require nursing care. On the day of our inspection there were 20 people living in the home.

The home had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service and shares the legal responsibility for meeting the requirements of the law with the provider.’

At the time of our inspection, the home was in the process of refurbishment which had been ongoing for several months. We were concerned about the lack of security, as we were able to enter the home, wander around and speak to people for fifteen minutes before we found a member of staff. Since our inspection, the refurbishment of the entrance area has been completed and access to the home can only be gained via a staff controlled secure door entry system.

Staff had been trained in safeguarding adults. They knew how to recognise the signs of abuse and how to report any concerns. There were procedures and risk assessments in place that staff implemented to reduce the risk of harm to people.

The manager and staff understood the main principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). People received their medicines safely and were adequately protected against the risk and spread of infection.

People were cared for by staff who were recruited through a thorough recruitment process. Appropriate checks were carried out on applicants before they began to work with people. The majority of staff were experienced care workers who had the skills, knowledge and experience to care for people safely.

There was a sufficient number of staff on duty to care for people safely and effectively. Staff understood their roles and responsibilities and were supported by the management through relevant training, supervision and performance reviews.

People were satisfied with the care they received and told us they were treated with respect and kindness. Staff ensured people received a nutritious, balanced diet and people who required it were supported to eat their meals. People were happy with the quality of their meals and said they were given enough to eat and drink.

People felt involved in their care planning and in control of the care they received. There were a variety of activities for people to participate in within the home but some people felt that more could be done to support people to participate in activities outside the home.

People’s healthcare needs were met by suitably qualified staff. Regular checks were carried out to maintain people’s health and well-being. People also had access to healthcare professionals and staff liaised well with external healthcare providers. People were supported to plan their end of life care.

There were systems in place to assess and monitor the quality of care people received. People felt able to express their views and told us the management and staff were responsive to their complaints and comments.

We inspected Heatherwood Nursing Home on 24 June 2015. The inspection was unannounced.

Heatherwood Nursing Home is registered to provide accommodation and personal care for up to 22 adults who may also require nursing care. On the day of our inspection there were 20 people living in the home.

The home had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service and shares the legal responsibility for meeting the requirements of the law with the provider.’

At the time of our inspection, the home was in the process of refurbishment which had been ongoing for several months. We were concerned about the lack of security, as we were able to enter the home, wander around and speak to people for fifteen minutes before we found a member of staff. Since our inspection, the refurbishment of the entrance area has been completed and access to the home can only be gained via a staff controlled secure door entry system.

Staff had been trained in safeguarding adults. They knew how to recognise the signs of abuse and how to report any concerns. There were procedures and risk assessments in place that staff implemented to reduce the risk of harm to people.

The manager and staff understood the main principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). People received their medicines safely and were adequately protected against the risk and spread of infection.

People were cared for by staff who were recruited through a thorough recruitment process. Appropriate checks were carried out on applicants before they began to work with people. The majority of staff were experienced care workers who had the skills, knowledge and experience to care for people safely.

There was a sufficient number of staff on duty to care for people safely and effectively. Staff understood their roles and responsibilities and were supported by the management through relevant training, supervision and performance reviews.

People were satisfied with the care they received and told us they were treated with respect and kindness. Staff ensured people received a nutritious, balanced diet and people who required it were supported to eat their meals. People were happy with the quality of their meals and said they were given enough to eat and drink.

People felt involved in their care planning and in control of the care they received. There were a variety of activities for people to participate in within the home but some people felt that more could be done to support people to participate in activities outside the home.

People’s healthcare needs were met by suitably qualified staff. Regular checks were carried out to maintain people’s health and well-being. People also had access to healthcare professionals and staff liaised well with external healthcare providers. People were supported to plan their end of life care.

There were systems in place to assess and monitor the quality of care people received. People felt able to express their views and told us the management and staff were responsive to their complaints and comments.

Inspection carried out on 30 August 2013

During a routine inspection

We found that before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. One person said of the staff, “they are always respectful and ask me if they want to do something for me or give me something.”

We reviewed four people’s care files and found that people’s needs were assessed and their care and treatment was delivered in accordance with their care plan. People were satisfied with the way their care was delivered. People using the service told us, “I am very happy here.” “The staff are lovely.” A relative said of the service, "the staff are their best asset, I have nothing but praise for them.”

We found that people were supported to be able to eat and drink sufficient amounts to meet their needs. People were provided with a choice of suitable and nutritious food and drink.

People who use the service were protected from the risk of abuse, because the provider had taken reasonable steps to identify the possibility of abuse and prevent abuse from happening. We looked at a variety of records relating to the people using the service, staff and management of the service. We found the records were well organised, up to date and fit for purpose.

Inspection carried out on 6 November 2012

During a routine inspection

Due to their needs, many people that we met during our visit were unable to share their views about the standards of care. The views of people who were able to comment on their experience can be summarised as follows “the staff are very good”, “staff are all friendly” and “I am lucky to be here”. We spoke to visiting relatives and they were very pleased with the care given and were kept well informed and involved in the care of their family members. Comments from people using the service were positive, with indication that staff were kind and helpful in meeting their care needs.

Inspection carried out on 2 February 2012

During a routine inspection

19 people were living at Heatherwood Nursing Home at the time of our visit. The majority of the people were receiving nursing care and many had dementia.

We were shown many of the rooms of people who live at the service. Some rooms had been individually decorated, with personal photographs on display, although staff told us this was due to personal preference. People we spoke to told us they were happy with their room.

People who use the service had planned activities throughout the week. One person told us about their interests and other people told us they enjoyed the musical entertainment provided at the home. The hairdresser visits Heatherwood twice a week. The home also arranges communion for those who wish to take it and celebrates birthdays. Pictures of these celebrations and various outings were on display in the entrance hall.

We spoke to some people and they indicated they were happy at Heatherwood Nursing Home and positive about the staff.

People we saw and spoke to indicated they were happy with their care. We observed two people sat talking together in the communal lounge. We spoke to another person who was happy to be in their own room.

During our visit we saw that people were able to move around the home using a variety of mobility aids including walking frames and wheelchairs. We saw staff helping individuals to mobilise during our time spent at the home.

The feedback we received from visiting friends and relatives was also extremely positive.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)