You are here

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Outstanding

Updated 10 August 2016

Aldbourne nursing home provides accommodation and nursing for up to 40 older people some of who are living with dementia. The home is situated on one level with two communal lounges and dining area, with a central kitchen and laundry. There is also a conservatory where people can sit.

At the time of our inspection there were 38 people living there.

The inspection took place on the 5 and 6 July 2016. The first day of the inspection was unannounced. At our last inspection of Aldbourne nursing home in May 2015 we found the provider did not meet some of the legal requirements in the areas we looked at. The provider wrote to us with a plan of what actions they would take to make the necessary improvements. We found during this inspection that the provider had undertaken all the necessary improvements required to fully meet people’s needs.

The service had a registered manager employed at the home. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were supported by very kind, caring and compassionate staff that would go the extra mile to ensure people received an excellent and personalised high standard of care. We found staff had an excellent knowledge and understanding of people’s needs, interests, likes and dislikes. We observed a range of warm and affectionate interactions during our inspection, with people using the service sharing jokes with staff and not hesitating to seek assistance where required.

People received personalised care that was responsive to their individual needs. People had access to activities that included their individual hobbies and interests. Links with the local village community had been established and people were supported to participate in events held within the local village such as fetes and other events that were meaningful to them. Time was spent on a one to one basis with people who chose not to attend group activities.

People, relatives and health and social care professionals spoke positively about staff and felt they had an excellent understanding of people’s individual needs to ensure they received personalised care from all staff. Health professionals told us that the service was committed to supporting people to remain independent or regain any independence lost. They gave examples of how people were supported to live the lives they wanted.

People were safe living at Aldbourne nursing home. There were enough staff on duty to meet people’s care and support needs safely. People received their medicines as prescribed and at the correct times. We saw that risks were managed through regular assessments and associated care plans and reviewed periodically throughout the year. Staff displayed a good understanding of how to keep people safe from potential harm or abuse.

The staff had received appropriate training and supervision to develop the skills and knowledge needed to provide people with the necessary care and support Training was comprehensive and regularly refreshed, with staff attending a range of training as well as training specific to the needs of people using the service, for example dementia awareness.

People spoke positively about the food and told us they received enough to eat and drink. Catering staff were knowledgeable about people’s likes, dislikes and dietary requirements. Action was taken by staff when they were concerned about people’s health and well-being.

There were effective pre-employment checks for the safe recruitment of staff, including criminal records checks and obtaining character references. New staff were inducted into the role with a combination of attending core training, shadowing experienced staff and completing the care certificate workbook.

We checked whether the service was working within the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005. We found related assessments and decisions had been properly taken and the provider had followed the requirements of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

The registered manager investigated complaints and concerns. People, their relatives and staff were supported and encouraged to share their views on the running of the home. The provider had quality monitoring systems in place. Accidents and incidents were investigated and discussed with staff to minimise the risks or reoccurrence.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 10 August 2016

This service was safe.

Safeguarding training had been completed and staff were aware of how to raise any concerns about people’s wellbeing to ensure people were safe.

Risks were assessed and reviewed regularly and control measures were put in place to minimise the risks to people.

Medicines were administered, stored and disposed of safely in line with the providers procedures.

Effective

Good

Updated 10 August 2016

This service was effective.

Staff had access to a range of training to ensure they had the correct knowledge and skills to provide people with care and support to meet their needs.

People had a choice of food and drink and they received sufficient to meet their needs. People spoke positively about the food choices available to them.

Concerns relating to people’s health and wellbeing were promptly acted upon by staff.

We found the service to be meeting the requirements of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. People’s best interests were managed appropriately under the Mental Capacity Act (2005).

Caring

Outstanding

Updated 10 August 2016

This service was extremely caring.

People were supported by staff who were extremely kind, caring and compassionate and who would go the extra mile to improve people’s quality of life.

People’s privacy and dignity were respected. Staff provided care in a way that maintained people’s dignity and upheld their rights.

People were actively encouraged to make choices about how they wished to live their lives. People and their relatives were involved in making decisions relating to care and support.

Responsive

Outstanding

Updated 10 August 2016

This service was extremely responsive.

People had access to activities that included their individual hobbies and interests. Links with the local community had been established and people were supported to participate in events held within the local community such as fetes and other events that were meaningful to them.

People’s individual care and support needs had been assessed and were responded to ensure they were being met. Staff provided personalised care to people that had in some cases improved their quality of life and wellbeing.

People and/or their relatives said they were able to speak with staff or the managers if they had any concerns or a complaint. They were confident their concerns would be listened to and appropriate action taken.

Well-led

Good

Updated 10 August 2016

This service was well-led.

There were effective systems in place to monitor the quality and safety of the service provided. Where required actions to improve the service had been identified and acted upon.

There were clear values that included treating people with dignity and respect and supporting people to remain independent. There was an open culture and staff told us they felt supported by management.

People using the service, relatives and health and social care professionals we spoke with told us the registered manager and matron were approachable and took action to ensure people’s needs were met and concerns addressed.